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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Pfizer, Mylan strengthen ties, create new company

Pfizer, the country’s largest drugmaker, is creating a hybrid new drug company by combining its off-patent branded drug business, Upjohn, with generic pharmaceutical company Mylan. The two companies said Monday that they’ll ultimately spin off the combination of Mylan, a $10 billion company, with Upjohn, which sells household names from Viagra to cholesterol fighter Lipitor that have lost patent protection.

EpiPen manufacturer will be a no-show at Senate hearing

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley says pharmaceutical company Mylan is declining to testify at his committee’s hearing next week on a settlement between the company and the Justice Department over its life-saving Epi-Pen.

Mylan CEO defends EpiPen cost to angry lawmakers

Outraged Republican and Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday grilled the head of pharmaceutical company Mylan about the significant cost increase of its lifesaving EpiPens and the profits for a company with sales in excess of $11 billion.

Gary Crooks: U.S. health care not a bargain

The reality is that patients in other countries are charged less for health care services and drugs across the board, because their governments make it so.

Mylan launching cheaper, generic version of EpiPen

Mylan will start selling a cheaper version of its EpiPen after absorbing waves of criticism over a list price for the emergency allergy treatment that has grown to $608 for a two-pack, making it unaffordable for many patients.

Outside View: Another black eye for Big Pharma

The following editorial from the Sacramento Bee does not necessarily reflect the view of The Spokesman-Review's editorial board. It’s bad enough that the price of life-saving EpiPens has exploded from $94 in 2007 to more than $600 now.