Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 77° Clear

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Hanford nuclear site study considers waste options

A federal government study has analyzed options for treating waste at a decommissioned nuclear site in Washington state. The Tri-City Herald reported that the National Academies of Sciences issued the draft analysis concerning ways to treat radioactive material at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland. The report says vitrifying or glassifying the waste would be more expensive than other options including expanding the plant or finding supplemental treatments to provide additional capacity.

Panel calls on FDA to review safety of opioid painkillers

An expert panel of scientists says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration should review the safety and effectiveness of all opioids, and consider the real-world impacts the powerful painkillers have, not only on patients, but also on families, crime and the demand for heroin.

Study: Up to 1 in 5 trauma victims may die unnecessarily

Up to 1 in 5 people may be dying unnecessarily from car crashes, gunshots or other injuries, a stark conclusion from government advisers who say where you live shouldn’t determine if you survive. The findings take on new urgency amid the increasing threat of mass casualties like the massacre in Orlando.

Treating hearing loss shouldn’t be a pricey hassle, panel says

Treating hearing loss shouldn’t be such a pricey hassle. That’s the message from a prestigious government advisory group that’s calling on Medicare and other agencies to find ways to make better hearing more affordable and accessible for millions of older Americans.

Report: Anti-bullying policies should be preventive

WASHINGTON – Zero-tolerance policies are ineffective in combating bullying, an independent government advisory group says in urging schools to take a more preventative approach that includes teaching tolerance to address this “serious public health problem.” In a report released Tuesday, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine said bullying should no longer be dismissed as merely a matter of kids being kids. “Its prevalence perpetuates its normalization. But bullying is not a normal part of childhood,” the report said.