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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Plan allows drilling, grazing near national monument in Utah

A new U.S. government management plan unveiled Friday clears the way for coal mining and oil and gas drilling on land that used to be off limits as part of a sprawling national monument in Utah before President Donald Trump downsized the protected area two years ago.

Trump administration officials dismissed benefits of national monuments

In a quest to shrink national monuments last year, senior Interior Department officials dismissed evidence that these public lands boosted tourism and spurred archaeological discoveries, according to documents the department released this month and retracted a day later.

Patagonia, outdoor retailers fight Trump on U.S. monuments

Outdoor clothing giant Patagonia and other retailers have jumped into a legal and political battle over President Donald Trump’s plan to shrink two sprawling Utah national monuments, a fight that would scare off most companies but galvanizes customers of outdoor brands that value environmental activism.

Lawsuits address whether presidents can modify monuments

A flurry of lawsuits challenging President Donald Trump’s decision to chop up two large national monuments in Utah could finally bring an answer to the much-debated question of whether presidents have the legal authority to undo or change monuments created by past presidents.

Tribes: Trump’s monument order disrespects native people

President Donald Trump’s rare move to shrink two large national monuments in Utah triggered another round of outrage among Native American leaders who vowed to unite and take the fight to court to preserve protections for lands they consider sacred.

Justice Department won’t release national monument documents

Documents possibly outlining legal justifications for President Donald Trump to shrink national monuments don't have to be provided to an Idaho environmental law firm because they're protected communications, federal officials say. The U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit...

Justice Department won’t release national monument documents

Federal officials said they don’t have to provide an Idaho environmental law firm with documents possibly outlining legal justifications for President Donald Trump to shrink national monuments because they’re protected communications.

Trump expected to significantly reduce 2 Utah monuments

President Donald Trump is expected to significantly downsize two sprawling Utah national monuments that protect more than 3 million acres of the state’s red rock country, Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch’s office said Tuesday.

Utah senator: Trump shrinking 2 national monuments in Utah

President Donald Trump is shrinking two national monuments in Utah, accepting the recommendation of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to reverse protections established by two Democratic presidents to more than 3.6 million acres.

House GOP moves to revamp law on national monuments

House Republicans are moving to revamp a century-old law used by presidents to protect millions of acres of federal land considered historic, geographically significant or culturally important.

Interior chief urges shrinking 4 national monuments in West

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that four large national monuments in the West be reduced in size, potentially opening up hundreds of thousands of acres of land revered for natural beauty and historical significance to mining, logging and other development.

Changes coming to U.S. protected lands, but details unknown

Tribes, ranchers and conservationists know that none of the national monuments ordered reviewed by President Donald Trump will be eliminated, but the changes in store for the sprawling land and sea areas remain a mystery after the administration kept a list of recommendations under wraps.