Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 31° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

US official: Nuclear energy can attract more supporters

BOISE – The resurgence of interest in nuclear power as a clean energy source could be boosted by emphasizing how it would help humanity, the chairwoman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Wednesday.

Germany is first major economy to phase out coal and nuclear

German lawmakers have finalized the country's long-awaited phase-out of coal as an energy source, backing a plan that environmental groups say isn't ambitious enough and free marketeers criticize as a waste of taxpayers' money.

U.S. nuclear lab partners with utilities to produce hydrogen

BOISE – The U.S. government’s primary nuclear lab is partnering with three energy utilities to find an economical way to use nuclear energy to produce hydrogen that can be stored and used to power everything from industry to personal vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy on Wednesday said the Idaho National Laboratory will work with Ohio-based FirstEnergy Solutions, Minnesota-based Xcel Energy, and Arizona Public Service.

Trump team’s asking for ways to keep nuclear power alive

President-elect Donald Trump’s advisers are looking at ways in which the U.S. government could help nuclear power generators being forced out of the electricity market by cheaper natural gas and renewable resources.

Beatrice Brailsford: Nuclear waste deal wrong for Idaho

At the beginning of 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy succeeded in wresting a preliminary agreement from Idaho’s governor and attorney general to allow two shipments of “research quantities” of commercial-spent nuclear fuel into Idaho. The proposal, if implemented, will almost certainly open the state to substantially more nuclear waste in the near future. Imports of commercial-spent fuel are banned by the 1995 Settlement Agreement, which was reached after decades of nuclear waste shipments into Idaho raised opposition throughout the state. The framework for research quantities of spent fuel was set in a 2011 memorandum of agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the state.

Bills seek to boost state nuclear efforts

OLYMPIA – Washington could renew its interest in nuclear energy by finding locations for small reactors and teaching teens about the industry, under a pair of bills the Senate passed Friday. One bill would require state officials to seek potential locations for “modular” nuclear reactors able to produce about a third of the power of traditional power plants. Traditional plants generate 1,000 megawatts or more while modular reactors generate 300 megawatts or less.

Washington lawmaker calls for focus on nuclear energy

OLYMPIA – The state should embrace nuclear energy by investing in small reactors that can fit on a train or semitruck, a Tri-Cities legislator says. Sen. Sharon Brown, R-Kennewick, is the prime sponsor of eight bills that call for enhanced interest in nuclear energy. One of them got a hearing Tuesday before the Senate Ways and Means Committee.

Nuclear lessons: Hanford tours go to heart of Cold War facility

RICHLAND – At Hanford’s B Reactor, thousands of graphite blocks towered over Ernie Doyle’s head. On a recent public tour, the 57-year-old truck driver from Hillsboro, Oregon, seized the chance to take a close look at the world’s first large-scale nuclear reactor.

Japan’s tsunami topic of lecture at Whitworth

Physicist Rich Wolfson, a physics professor at Middlebury College in Vermont, will present the 2012 Science and Society Lecture, “Nuclear Energy: An Environmentalist’s Perspective,” on Monday in the Robinson Teaching Theatre in Weyerhaeuser Hall at Whitworth University at 7 p.m. Wolfson’s lecture will focus on the tsunami in Japan and the subsequent meltdown at the country’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, as well as the rewards and risks of nuclear energy.

Face Time: Otter talks about Western Governors’ goals

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter, chairman of the Western Governors Association, will hand over the gavel to the incoming chairwoman – Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire – at the close of this week’s annual conference of the 19-state group in Coeur d’Alene. We asked Otter about the direction he’s taken the association in the past year and what to expect from the Coeur d’Alene conference. Q.Why did you take on this role?

Bonneville Power Administration seeks efficiency gains

HANFORD – The Columbia Generating Station is undergoing its most expensive refueling and maintenance shutdown ever as the owner of the nuclear plant tries to improve its reliability and costs. More than 1,700 electricians, steamfitters and other skilled-trade workers have swarmed this site 10 miles north of Richland. Besides the refueling done every two years to refresh and reposition rods containing uranium, they are replacing the generator rotor and a huge steam condenser that has caused repeated shutdowns.

Reactor undergoes refueling, upgrades

HANFORD — The Columbia Generating Station here is undergoing its most expensive refueling and maintenance shutdown ever as the owner of the nuclear plant tries to improve its reliability and costs. More than 1,700 electricians, steamfitters and other skilled-trade workers have swarmed this site 10 miles north of Richland. Besides the refueling done every two years to refresh and reposition rods containing uranium, they are replacing the generator rotor and a huge steam condenser that has caused repeated shutdowns.