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Tuesday, October 20, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Independent Idaho in for poll surprise

BOISE – Say you’re an Idaho voter who wants to cast a ballot in next year’s primary election for Sarah Palin for president, or Mike Huckabee, or Mitt Romney. In a state that’s never had party registration, you could be in for a surprise at the polls, where voters will be required to become party members – or they might not get to vote in anything but nonpartisan judges’ races.

Eye on Boise: Otter says closed primary an imperfect compromise

BOISE – Gov. Butch Otter has signed into law historic changes in Idaho’s election system, requiring, for the first time, that all Idahoans declare their party affiliation to vote in the state’s primary election. “I felt that that was a compromise effort between the House and the Senate,” Otter said of the closed-primary bill. “With the judge’s ruling, there weren’t very many other alternatives that we felt could meet constitutional muster.”

Public to pay for GOP suit

BOISE – Idaho lawmakers rushed through a bill to pay $100,000 to the Idaho Republican Party – to which 81 percent of them belong – in the final days of this year’s legislative session, to cover the party’s attorney fees in its successful primary election lawsuit against the state. Though it’s not uncommon for prevailing parties to get their legal fees paid in a federal civil rights case, what’s unusual is how the Idaho GOP set up its fee arrangement with its attorney – a rare “contingent fee” deal in which only the taxpayers would have to pay, not the party, regardless of the outcome.

Idaho lawmakers rush unusual payment to state GOP

Idaho lawmakers rushed through a bill to pay $100,000 to the Idaho Republican Party - to which 81 percent of them belong - in the final days of this year's legislative session, to cover the party's attorney fees in its successful primary election lawsuit against the state.

Closed primary legislation hits snag in Idaho House

BOISE – Legislation to require Idahoans to register by political party and allow parties to close primary elections to all but party members ran into trouble in a House committee Tuesday after flying through the Senate with the backing of top GOP legislative leaders. “I think it is a fundamental shift in election policy, and I have some questions about this bill that I need answered,” said state Rep. Brent Crane, R-Nampa.

Idaho closed-primary election bill stalls

Legislation to require Idahoans, for the first time, to register by political party and allow parties to close their primaries to all but party members ran into trouble in a House committee this morning, after flying through the Senate with the backing of top GOP legislative leaders.

Idaho’s open primary infringes on GOP, judge rules

BOISE – A federal judge on Wednesday declared Idaho’s open primary election system unconstitutional, ruling that it violates the right of the state’s Republican Party to limit primaries to members. “An important corollary of the right to freely associate is a right not to associate,” wrote U.S. District Judge Lynn Winmill in his decision. He found “clear evidence of crossover voting” in Idaho’s primaries.

Judge declares Idaho’s open primaries unconstitutional

A federal judge on Wednesday declared Idaho's open primary election system unconstitutional, ruling that it violates the right of the state's Republican Party to ban anyone who's not a party member from voting in its primaries.

GOP argues for closed primary in Idaho

BOISE – The Idaho Republican Party finally got its chance Wednesday to make a case for scrapping the state’s open primary, which they say allows Democratic voters to unfairly influence GOP politics and results at the ballot box. The job of defending Idaho’s 37-year-old system has put Secretary of State Ben Ysursa at odds with his own party’s wishes. But in a state already dominated by the GOP, Ysursa questioned the merits of tinkering with a system that’s reaping Republican benefits.