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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Pilgrim’s hopes to pioneer market gardens in Lake City

The owner of Pilgrim’s Market in Coeur d’Alene wants to establish a market garden on a vacant residential lot behind the natural foods store and is asking the city to allow other residents to grow and sell food.

Organic food retailer Natural Grocers plans first Spokane location

A Colorado-based chain of nearly 90 natural food stores is seeking to open a new outlet at Division Street and Wellesley Avenue. Natural Grocers has a store in Coeur d’Alene, 222 W. Neider Ave., but would be entering the Spokane area for the first time.

Pediatricians offer first report on organic foods

CHICAGO (AP) — Parents who want to reduce their kids' exposure to pesticides may seek out organic fruits and vegetables, but they aren't necessarily safer or more nutritious than conventional foods, the nation's leading pediatricians group says in its first advice on organics. Science hasn't proven that eating pesticide-free food makes people any healthier, the American Academy of Pediatrics said.

Study questions how much better organic food is

WASHINGTON (AP) — Patient after patient asked: Is eating organic food, which costs more, really better for me? Unsure, Stanford University doctors dug through reams of research to find out — and concluded there's little evidence that going organic is much healthier, citing only a few differences involving pesticides and antibiotics.

Study questions how much better organic food is

WASHINGTON (AP) — Patient after patient asked: Is eating organic food, which costs more, really better for me? Unsure, Stanford University doctors dug through reams of research to find out — and concluded there's little evidence that going organic is much healthier, citing only a few differences involving pesticides and antibiotics.

Ignore the myths; focus on making best green choices

Forget “Ghostbusters.” Today, I’m fighting popular green myths to help you get started on going green. With all the misinformation out there, it’s important to zero in on effective ways to save money, save resources and live healthier. • Myth: Organic is the only way to go: False! Organic is one good option when food shopping because it means the food or produce was not created or grown with synthetic chemical pesticides or insecticides. However, locally grown foods are another important way to be eco-friendly. Those foods are from farms within a few hundred miles, not shipped from across the world to get to your table.

Rocky Ridge Ranch owners keep it real with meat, produce

Thanksgiving turkeys come in all sizes. And some are raised differently than others. Gary Angell’s turkeys roam free and eat a homemade mixture of what he calls “real food.” They cost more than supermarket varieties, yet customers reserve their holiday birds months in advance. Angell and his wife, So YiDeuke, operate Rocky Ridge Ranch, specializing in naturally raised meats, free-range poultry and organic vegetables. We chatted with Angell at the South Perry District’s Thursday Market.

‘Organic’ label vexes hop farmers, brewers

YAKIMA – It wasn’t until recently that Moxee farmer Pat Smith finished selling a crop of organic hops that he grew two years ago. But he’s still sitting on another 100 bales from a more recent harvest.

Food’s origins adds to dining experience

Today, it isn’t enough to simply pick up a menu, consider the choices and place an order with the server. We want more than just a delicious meal. For many of us, where the food we’ll be eating originated is as important as how it will be served.

Even after theft, nonprofit eatery’s doors swing wide open for holiday

One World Spokane will offer a Thanksgiving dinner from 2 to 5 p.m. today, nourishing Spokane’s underprivileged as it has for the past year. The nonprofit restaurant in the East Central neighborhood provides fresh, organic food to people who typically don’t have access to that fare. Instead of a menu with set prices, patrons pay what they can.

Fresh Abundance closes South Hill grocery store

A small South Hill store operated by Fresh Abundance closed this week to allow the fresh and organic foods grocer to focus on two other locations, said BrightSpirit Hendrix, the company’s president. Hendrix and her husband, Jacque Hendrix, launched the first of three food centers six years ago. Their location in a South Hill residence started as a place for neighborhood home delivery of fresh food. As demand grew, Fresh Abundance opened a storefront. The couple closed it Monday.

Liberty Lake Farmer’s Market excited for upcoming season

The City of Liberty Lake has a lot of heart. And one way it takes shape is in their Farmers’ Market—a vital, pulsating hub that has pumped life into the community and served as a model for other markets since 2001.

The Wonder of Organic Winter Veggies

Believe it or not, the winter months are a great time to eat local vegetables. Late-winter vegetables are ready to take center stage at your table.