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Monday, October 26, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Florida sues Walgreens, CVS over opioid sales

Florida is suing the nation’s two largest drugstore chains, Walgreens and CVS, alleging they added to the state and national opioid crisis by overselling painkillers and not taking precautions to stop illegal sales.

FDA approves a powerful new opioid amid criticism

The Food and Drug Administration approved a powerful new opioid Friday for use in health care settings, rejecting criticism from some of its own advisors that it would inevitably be diverted to illicit use and cause more overdose deaths.

Feds say heroin, fentanyl remain biggest drug threat to U.S.

Drug overdose deaths hit the highest level ever recorded in the United States last year, with an estimated 200 people dying per day, according to a report by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Most of that was the result of a record number of opioid-related deaths.

OxyContin maker will stop promoting opioids to doctors

The maker of the powerful painkiller OxyContin said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, a surprise reversal following lawsuits that blamed the company for helping trigger the current drug abuse epidemic.

Panel calls on FDA to review safety of opioid painkillers

An expert panel of scientists says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration should review the safety and effectiveness of all opioids, and consider the real-world impacts the powerful painkillers have, not only on patients, but also on families, crime and the demand for heroin.

NFL team docs booed DEA official at 2011 presentation

A top drug-enforcement official invited by the NFL in 2011 to educate team physicians about medicating players in compliance with federal laws was met with skepticism, catcalls and even occasional boos from the doctors gathered, according to a published report. Joseph Rannazzisi, who headed the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Office of Diversion Control until retiring in 2015, couldn’t recall a more hostile reception during hundreds of previous presentations.

Workers’ comp programs fight addiction among injured workers

Meet a victim of the nation’s opioid addiction scourge: the American worker. A number of U.S. states are taking steps through their workers’ compensation systems to stem the overprescribing of the powerful painkillers to workers injured on the job, while helping those who became hooked to avoid potentially deadly consequences. Injured workers, like so many others dealing with pain, are often prescribed opioids like OxyContin and Vicodin.

Court filings describe NFL misuse of painkillers

National Football League teams violated federal laws governing prescription drugs, disregarded guidance from the Drug Enforcement Administration on how to store, track, transport and distribute controlled substances, and plied their players with powerful painkillers and anti-inflammatories each season, according to sealed court documents contained in a federal lawsuit filed by former players.