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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Friday, October 23, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Gardening: Conditions right for powdery mildew to strike

The evenings are cooling and because we are still watering gardens, the evening humidity is rising. It’s the perfect recipe for the formation of powdery mildew on vegetables like lettuce, cucumbers, squash and tomatoes, as well as grapes, ornamentals, fruits and berries, apples and a few dozen more.

Nip mildew in bud before it appears

Are the leaves of some of your favorite plants covered with a strange powder that makes them look like they were dusted with flour? You have powdery mildew. A number of plants are susceptible to powdery mildew, such as phlox, lupine, hazel, birch, maple, roses, lilacs, monarda, grapes, gooseberries, squash and cucumbers. Over the past couple of years here, maples have been particularly affected. Squash and cucumber plants almost always have it in the early fall when the temperatures cool and the humidity rises.

Gardening: Nip mildew in bud before it appears

Are the leaves of some of your favorite plants covered with a strange powder that makes them look like they were dusted with flour? You have powdery mildew. A number of plants are susceptible to powdery mildew, such as phlox, lupine, hazel, birch, maple, roses, lilacs, monarda, grapes, gooseberries, squash and cucumbers. Over the past couple of years here, maples have been particularly affected. Squash and cucumber plants almost always have it in the early fall when the temperatures cool and the humidity rises.

Taming powdery mildew on leaves, melons takes time

Our recent spate of hot and cold weather has brought out a late outbreak of powdery mildew. Leaves on roses, lupines, phlox, squash, melons and even maple trees have all picked up the telltale whitish coating. Maple trees have been particularly hard hit this year. Typically, powdery mildew covers leaves and tender shoots with a powdery, grayish-white coating dotted later in the season with small brown or black spots. With a heavy infestation, the leaves can be distorted, curled and stunted, reducing their ability to make food for the plant.

Bad year for plant mildew

It's like a ghost creeping into the garden. Your roses, lupines, phlox and a dozen other plants begin to take on a white, dusty haze ruining the look of otherwise beautiful plants. Welcome to a powdery mildew invasion. And this year it's particularly bad. Typically, powdery mildew covers the leaves and tender shoots with a powdery, grayish-white coating. Later in the season small brown or black spots appear. With a heavy infestation, the leaves can be distorted, curled and stunted.