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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Enforcement of indoor vaccine mandates proves uneven in US

HONOLULU — Go out for a night on the town in some U.S. cities and you might find yourself waiting while someone at the door of the restaurant or theater closely inspects your vaccination card and checks it against your photo ID. Or, conversely, you might be waved right through just by flashing your card.

Facebook froze as anti-vaccine comments swarmed users

 In March, as claims about the dangers and ineffectiveness of coronavirus vaccines spun across social media and undermined attempts to stop the spread of the virus, some Facebook employees thought they had found a way to help.

Glass recycler reaches deal with Oregon to curb pollution

A glass recycling plant in northeast Portland has consented to either shut down or install pollution control technology, according to an agreement announced between the plant’s operators and the state of Oregon.

Africa tries to end vaccine inequity by replicating its own

CAPE TOWN, South Africa – In a pair of Cape Town warehouses converted into a maze of airlocked sterile rooms, young scientists are assembling and calibrating the equipment needed to reverse engineer a coronavirus vaccine that has yet to reach South Africa and most of the world’s poorest people.

Boo! Thousands crowd New Orleans streets for 1st parade

NEW ORLEANS – The high school bands played, the costumed marching groups danced and float riders threw Moon Pies and beads to the thousands of people who turned out Saturday for New Orleans’ first big parade since the onslaught of the coronavirus pandemic put the brakes on the city’s signature brand of frivolity.

Vaccine mandates create conflict with defiant workers

BATH, Maine – Josh “Chevy” Chevalier is a third-generation shipbuilder who hasn’t missed a day of work during the pandemic in his job as a welder constructing Navy warships on the Maine coast.

Disruptions to schooling fall hardest on vulnerable students

Even as schools have returned in full swing across the country, complications wrought by the pandemic persist, often falling hardest on those least able to weather them: families without transportation, people with limited income or other financial hardship, people who don't speak English, children with special needs.

Is there a constitutional right to food? Mainers to decide

PORTLAND, Maine — Depending on whom you ask, Maine’s proposed “right to food” constitutional amendment would simply put people in charge of how and what they eat — or would endanger animals and food supplies, and turn urban neighborhoods into cattle pastures.

Idaho clinics rush to train staff for COVID booster rollout

BOISE — With expanded access to coronavirus boosters approved and vaccinations for younger kids on the horizon, family physicians are fielding phone calls from people eager to get the shots. But this round of vaccinations is more complicated than the last — with mix-and-match possibilities between different vaccine brands, different dosage sizes and varying rules about exactly who qualifies for which booster.

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:

Explainer: Is it time to get a COVID-19 booster? Which one?

Millions more Americans just became eligible for COVID-19 boosters, but figuring out who’s eligible and when can be confusing. And adding to the challenge is that this time around, people can choose a different brand of vaccine for that extra dose.

3 years after Pittsburgh synagogue attack, trial still ahead

PITTSBURGH — As the three-year mark since the massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue approaches, survivors are planning now-familiar annual rituals of remembrance, the criminal case involving the suspect plods on, and the site is in line for restoration.