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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Tuesday, October 27, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Operator: Two units of Montana coal plant to close this year

The company that operates a coal-fired power plant in eastern Montana said Tuesday it will close two of the plant’s four units about 30 months ahead of schedule because of the high cost of running them and the unwillingness of its coal supplier to lower prices.

Northwest tribes ask Gov. Inslee to halt Tacoma plant construction

The Puyallup Tribe and leaders from 14 other Northwest tribes have called on Gov. Jay Inslee to stop the construction of Puget Sound Energy’s liquefied natural gas plant on Tacoma’s Tideflats, urging a delay until an environmental review is complete “and all permit requirements are satisfied.”

Settlement sets aside $10M for Colstrip community

Puget Sound Energy, the largest owner of the Colstrip power plant in Montana, says it will be able to pay down its debts from two newer units there by 2027, years earlier than previously expected.

Avista, Inland Power’s results differ with new energy standards

Wind turbines spinning on the Palouse are the final piece of Avista Utilities’ strategy to meet Washington’s new renewable energy standards. Energy from the 58-turbine Palouse Wind farm, which started operations last year, has pushed the Spokane-based utility over the top. Even with future customer growth, Avista officials say they’ve lined up enough qualifying renewable energy to meet Initiative 937’s requirements through 2020.

Renewable energy thirst fueled wind farms on gusty ridges

ELLENSBURG – Gusty winds sweep through Central Washington’s Kittitas County, scattering tumbleweeds and spinning the blades of 149 turbines on Whisky Dick Mountain.    The westerly wind is a gift of geography. Moist air from the Pacific Ocean picks up speed as it’s forced through Snoqualmie Pass. As it hurtles down the eastern slopes of the Cascades, it rushes through Puget Sound Energy’s Wild Horse wind project. Since 2006, the Seattle-based utility has harnessed the wind, converting its force into kilowatts of electricity. When wind speeds hit 9 mph, the turbines start producing power for the utility’s customers in the Puget Sound region.