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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Friday, October 30, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Then and Now: Echo Roller Mill

Samuel G. Havermale, for whom the island in Riverfront Park is named, built the first roller mill in Washington Territory in 1883. It was torn down in 1927 to make way for the railroad.

Then and Now: Transcontinental railroads

Since the 1890s, Spokane was often touted as a hub for four transcontinental railroads, the implication being that it was a good place to do business and ship goods across the U.S. continent.

Idaho miner helps rediscover lawless Bitterroot boomtown seemingly lost to history

High in the Bitterroot Mountains, 100 miles from Spokane, a long-forgotten Old West legacy “boot hill” is sparking new interest. The Taft Cemetery – the only remnant of one of the West’s last lawless railroad boomtowns – was rediscovered in recent months, thanks to the keen memory of a retired 78-year-old Idaho miner and modern metal-detecting technology.

Then and Now: The Chemical Block

Named for a pharmaceutical warehouse built on the corner of Sprague and Howard in the 1890s, the Chemical Block was home to several businesses before being demolished in 1960 to build a parking garage for a nearby bank.

Cuba tries to revive its once-great railway network

Cuba’s railway system is undergoing a major overhaul, with the government pushing a program to revamp the decrepit and aging network with new cars and locomotives in the hope of restoring a rail service that was once the envy of Latin America.

Cannons, bells, music mark 150th anniversary of railroad

Thousands of people gathered Friday at the remote spot in the Utah desert where the final spikes of the Transcontinental Railroad were hammered 150 years ago, uniting a nation long separated by vast expanses of desert, mountains and forests and fresh off the Civil War.

Descendants ensure Chinese rail workers aren’t forgotten

Michael Kwan can’t help but think about what life was like on a daily basis for his great-great-grandfather in the 1860s, working 12-hour days in California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range on the Transcontinental Railroad that would reshape the American landscape.