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Saturday, October 24, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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The last Pearl Harbor survivor in Spokane honors the fallen

The Inland Northwest’s last known survivor of the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor was joined by admirers and supporters for Thursday’s ceremony to commemorate what President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared a day of infamy.

Video: Ray Garland describes attack

In a video produced by SR photographers, Ray Garland, 94, the last, living military veteran on the membership roster of the Lilac City Chapter of Pearl Harbor Survivors, describes the attack on Dec. 7, 1941. You can see the video below.

The last, local Pearl Harbor survivor

Garland, 94, of Coeur d'Alene, is the last living military veteran on the membership roster of the Lilac City Chapter of Pearl Harbor Survivors. At one time the chapter had 125 active members from all over the Inland Empire. Cindy Hval talks to him about his experience at Pearl Harbor 75 years ago tomorrow.

Pearl Harbor Survivor Ray Garland

Ray Garland, 94, is the last living military veteran on the membership roster of the Lilac City Chapter of Pearl Harbor Survivors. At one time the chapter had 125 active members from all over the Inland Empire. Just before 8 a.m. on Dec. 7, 1941, a weary Ray Garland joined a small group of sailors and Marines on the quarterdeck of the USS Tennessee. He’d been on watch since 4 a.m. but got off early to help raise the colors. “I heard a noise,” he recalled. “A corporal said, ‘Turn around,’ so I did. I saw a Japanese dive bomber flying alongside us. He was so close, I could see his goggles.”

Pearl Harbor survivors mark anniversary in Spokane

Ray Garland knew only one thing on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941: He had a job to do. Garland watched for a moment as the bombs from Japanese forces fell on Pearl Harbor, destroying the nearby USS Arizona. Then, with an enemy to battle and a country to protect, 19-year-old Garland and the other Marines aboard the USS Tennessee leapt into action.