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Thursday, October 22, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Stance on abortion politics varies widely among U.S. clergy

James Altman is a Roman Catholic priest in Wisconsin, little known outside his parish until a few weeks ago. Robert Jeffress is the high-profile pastor of a Baptist megachurch in Dallas. They have a message in common for members of their faiths: Voting for Democrats who support abortion rights is an evil potentially deserving of eternal damnation.

Man convicted in Portland train attacks must pay victims

PORTLAND – A judge on Wednesday ordered a man convicted of fatally stabbing two men who confronted him during a racist rant on a Portland, Oregon, light-rail train to pay $12,046 for expenses incurred by some of his victims.

Pope: Market capitalism has failed in pandemic, needs reform

Pope Francis says the coronavirus pandemic has proven that the “magic theories” of market capitalism have failed and that the world needs a new type of politics that promotes dialogue and solidarity and rejects war at all costs.

High court sparks new battle over church-state separation

The Supreme Court elated religious freedom advocates and alarmed secular groups with its Tuesday ruling on public funding for religious education, a decision whose long-term effect on the separation of church and state remains to be seen.

Cardinal Pell to publish prison diary musing on case, church

ROME – Cardinal George Pell, the former Vatican finance minister who was convicted and then acquitted of sexual abuse in his native Australia, is set to publish his prison diary musing on life in solitary confinement, the Catholic Church, politics and sports.

Trump’s HHS pushes LGBT health rollback

WASHINGTON – The Trump administration Friday moved forward with a rule that rolls back health care protections for transgender people, even as the Supreme Court barred sex discrimination against LGBT individuals on the job.

Pope comes to Philadelphia, pays tribute women in the church

PHILADELPHIA — Pope Francis arrived in the City of Brotherly Love on Saturday for the final leg of his U.S. visit — a festive weekend devoted to celebrating Catholic families — and immediately called for the church to place greater value on women. The pontiff's plane touched down at the Philadelphia airport after takeoff from New York, bringing him to a city of blocked-off streets, sidewalks lined with portable potties, and checkpoints manned by police, National Guardsmen and border agents.

‘Bold’ Ireland votes to legalize gay marriage in landslide

DUBLIN — Ireland's citizens have voted in a landslide to legalize gay marriage, electoral officials announced Saturday — a stunningly lopsided result that illustrates what Catholic leaders and rights activists alike called a "social revolution." Friday's referendum saw 62.1 percent of Irish voters say "yes" to changing the nation's constitution to define marriage as a union between two people regardless of their sex. Outside Dublin Castle, watching the results announcement in its cobblestoned courtyard, thousands of gay rights activists cheered, hugged and cried at the news.

AP Analysis: In fractured Israel, all electoral bets are off

JERUSALEM (AP) — Deeply divided and foul of mood, Israelis are headed toward what seems like a referendum on their long-serving, silver-tongued prime minister, the hard-line Benjamin Netanyahu. But with so many of them having despaired of peace talks with the Palestinians, the focus is mostly on Netanyahu's personality, his expense scandals and the soaring cost of living.

In milestone, Pope Francis will address Congress this fall

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a landmark event that could have many holding their breath, Pope Francis has agreed to address a joint meeting of Congress this fall. That sets the stage for an oration by an outspoken pontiff whose views on immigration and global warming clash with those of many Republicans who run the House and Senate. Francis will speak Sept. 24, marking the first time the head of the world's Roman Catholics will address Congress. It will come during the first U.S. visit of Francis' two-year-old papacy, a trip also expected to include a White House meeting with President Barack Obama, a speech to the United Nations in New York and a Catholic rally for families in Philadelphia.

Pope: Catholics don’t have to breed ‘like rabbits’

ABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE (AP) — Pope Francis is firmly upholding church teaching banning contraception, but said Monday that Catholics don't have to breed "like rabbits" and should instead practice "responsible parenting." Speaking to reporters en route home from the Philippines, Francis said there are plenty of church-approved ways to regulate births. But he said most importantly, no outside institution should impose its views on regulating family size, blasting what he called the "ideological colonization" of the developing world.

In sharp turn, gay couples marry in Arizona

PHOENIX (AP) — Gay marriage has become legal in Arizona after the state's conservative attorney general said Friday that he wouldn't challenge a federal court decision that cleared the way for same-sex unions in the state. The announcement prompted gay couples to line up at the downtown courthouse in Phoenix, where they began to marry immediately.

Pope removes divisive bishop in Paraguay

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis on Thursday forcibly removed a conservative Paraguayan bishop who had clashed with his fellow bishops on ideological grounds and promoted a priest accused of inappropriate sexual behavior. The removal of Bishop Rogelio Ricardo Livieres Plano, a member of the conservative Opus Dei movement, marks the second time Francis has kicked out a conservative bishop for the sake of keeping peace among the faithful and unity among bishops.

Pope names Cupich as next Chicago archbishop

Pope Francis today appointed Spokane's Bishop Blase Cupich, a moderate who has called for civility in the culture wars, as the next archbishop of Chicago, signaling a shift in tone in one of the most important posts in the U.S. church. Cupich will be installed in the Archdiocese of Chicago in November, succeeding Cardinal Francis George, according to an announcement by the papal ambassador to the U.S. The archdiocese has scheduled a news conference for this morning which Cupich is expected to attend. George, 77, has been battling cancer and has said he believes the disease will end his life.

Iraq suicide bomber kills at least 11 in Baghdad

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraqi officials say a suicide bombing against an Interior Ministry building in central Baghdad has killed at least 11 people. A police officer says the suicide bomber drove an explosives-laden car into the gate of the intelligence headquarters in Karrada district Saturday afternoon, killing six civilians and five security personnel.

Hate crime case resurrects racial wounds in NYC

NEW YORK (AP) — Yitzhak Shuchat, a white member of a civilian patrol group, and Andrew Charles, the black son of a police officer, came face to face in 2008 in a neighborhood with a history of racial strife — that much is certain. But six years later, the circumstances of the encounter in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn remain murky, even as prosecutors pursue charges against 28-year-old Shuchat alleging he attacked Charles because of his race. Shuchat's supporters in the neighborhood's Orthodox Jewish community have reacted with dismay over what they call a hate crime investigation gone awry.