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Tuesday, October 27, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Huckleberries: Whoa there Pilgrim … Take ’er easy on the squash

It’s not every day that you feel betrayed by butternut squash. But David Townsend, communications director of the Coeur d’Alene Library, feels bamboozled after grazing at the swell salad bar at Pilgrim’s Market in Midtown Coeur d’Alene.

Huckleberries: St. Paddy’s tie recalls S&H Green Stamps

She avoided the term “whippersnapper” because KXLY’s Kris Crocker is too gracious for that. But she did provide context for colleague Casey Lund when he wore an S&H Green Stamps tie at work on St. Patrick’s Day. Huckleberries Thursday launches with a trip down memory lane with Green Stamps.

Huckleberries: After 30 years, Centennial Trail supporters finally achieve goal

Thirty years ago, North Idaho Centennial Trail supporters faced stiff resistance from neighbors or industrial companies in two areas – the Pinevilla subdivision in Post Falls and an industrial row along Seltice Way entering Coeur d’Alene. The resistance was so fierce that a former county commissioner proposed dubbing the Spokane River as a symbolic link between Coeur d’Alene and Post Falls – and forgetting the trail. Now, a trail along the former industrial row is about to become a reality.

Huckleberries: Pacific NW swell today, it was better 55 years ago

Fifty-five years ago, senior editor Leonard Gross of Look magazine launched a 50-page spread with this sentence: “The one great mystery of the Pacific Northwest is why all of us aren’t living there.” In today's Huckleberries column, we revisit what the Pacific Northwest was like 55 years ago.

Huckleberries: Pacific Northwest is swell now, but it was even better 55 years ago

Fifty-five years ago, senior editor Leonard Gross of Look magazine launched a 50-page spread about this region with the sentence: “The one great mystery of the Pacific Northwest is why all of us aren’t living there.” At that time, only 5.5 million people lived in the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Idaho, Oregon and Montana). Back then, Northwesterners had an attitude toward newcomers that's much the same today: Let’s lock them out.

Huckleberries: History book on CdA’s City Park coming soon

Landscape architect Jon Mueller has written a history book, chock full of old photos, about Coeur d'Alene's City Park. The history of City Park is tied closely to the history of Fort Sherman and the development of Coeur d'Alene. Huckleberries Monday begins with this news today.

Huckleberries: Coeur d’Alene’s City Park focus of soon-to-be book

On July 4, 1890, the day after Idaho became a state, the soldiers at Fort Sherman gathered with the rough-and-rowdy residents of Coeur d'Alene for a parade and a day of picnics, games, swimming and fireworks. The festivities was held in a corner of the fort's property -- a place that's now known as City Park. Jon Mueller, a landscape architect and native son, has written a 200-page book, chock-full of photos, about City Park. It'll be published in early May.

Huckleberries: Much-maligned Rachel Dolezal once faced down racists

Before Rachel Dolezal became a punch line for late-night talk shows, she faced down six white supremacists near the western entrance to downtown Coeur d’Alene. The neo-Nazis were demonstrating against the annual Martin Luther King celebration for fifth-graders at North Idaho College. Rachel was bravely counter-protesting against the racists. All. By. Herself.