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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Getting There: Hatch Bridge to get new deck and maybe a turn lane, causing long detours

When the city of Spokane shutters the brief span over Latah Creek in the spring to repair it, drivers will lose a vital connection from Highway 195 to the South Hill and will instead be directed to drive north on High Drive, get on Interstate 90 at Maple Street and head west before circling back down 195 to get where they are going.

Getting There: ‘Clear gas’ a returning phenomenon, but most cars don’t need it

Eighteen fill-up stations in Spokane and Spokane Valley offer gasoline with no ethanol or lead, additives that have been included throughout the years to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. Ethanol’s addition to the gasoline running modern cars is a relatively new occurrence, but the story behind lead has ties to the bottom line of America’s early automobile manufacturers.

Then and Now: Latah Creek Bridge

The Latah Creek bridge, also known as the Sunset Boulevard bridge, was built after the Monroe Street Bridge in downtown and features a similar design. It was constructed in large part due to booming wheat farming in central Washington and more motorist interest in traveling to Seattle.

Getting There: Pay heed, motorists, to the South Hill stop sign

A very unscientific survey last week at High Drive and Grand Avenue shows motorists heading south on Grand have not yet adapted to a stop sign installed at the intersection last week. The city says the stop sign is warranted because east/west traffic has increased to match southbound motorists.

Spokane City Council members would consider asking voters to keep car registration fees after passage of I-976

A majority of Spokane City Council members said they are open to asking voters to reinstate an annual $20 car registration fee, or find other tax sources, to fund local road maintenance projects, after state voters repealed the local car tab and other similar fees under Initiative 976. The willingness to consider reinstating the tax illustrates the city’s reliance on the local registration fee, even in the face of solid approval of the ballot measure, which was ostensibly about strictly limiting vehicle registration fees to $30.

Ranchers win suit over Spokane County’s Bigelow Gulch Road expansion

The judgment for Frank and Gloria Bingaman, who have run cattle operations on their property for 31 years, is compensation for land taken by the county as it widens Bigelow Gulch east of the city from two lanes to a four-lane road with wide shoulders and a center turn lane.