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Friday, October 30, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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From heat to snow: Rocky Mountains see 60-degree plunge

Summer came to an abrupt halt in parts of the Rocky Mountains on Tuesday as temperatures reaching into the 90s plunged by around 60 degrees in less than 24 hours, with a powerful surge of cold air from Canada unleashing snow and damaging winds in several states.

Trump signs $3B-a-year plan to boost conservation, parks

President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed into law legislation that will devote nearly $3 billion annually to conservation projects, outdoor recreation and maintenance of national parks and other public lands. The measure was overwhelmingly approved by Congress.

Wintry blast closes schools, plunges temperatures in Rockies

Some schools in Montana took their earliest snow day in memory Monday after a blizzard dumped several feet of snow, while plunging temperatures threatened crops across other parts of the Rocky Mountains in an unusually early blast of wintry weather.

Majestic Mountains: The Canadian Rockies remain wild, wonderful

The Canadian Rockies and their surrounding territories have retained this ancient majesty. Thanks in part to the naming of British Columbia’s and Alberta’s four national and three provincial parks as UNESCO World Heritage sites, the western Canadian wilderness is one of the few regions in the world that can still be called that –

Hunter’s find leads to discovery of prehistoric sea creature

A fossil found by an elk hunter in Montana nearly seven years ago has led to the discovery of a new species of prehistoric sea creature that lived about 70 million years ago in the inland sea that flowed east of the Rocky Mountains.

Amtrak offers grand views of Montana, the Rockies

NEAR WAGNER, Mont. – The train rolls past distant hills – mountains, an easterner would call them. But it’s just a tease. Out here is mostly prairie and thin wire fences and undulating gray moguls of land, mysterious for what lies beneath, all dinosaur fossils and buffalo bones. The sky is huge and blue and endless. Here is where Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid embarked on their last train robbery. Here is the middle of Montana. Here is the West. Then, there’s an announcement.

Bangs retiring after leading wolf recovery

HELENA – Ed Bangs, who for 23 years led the effort to reintroduce and recover healthy wolf populations in the northern Rocky Mountains, is retiring from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in June. As the federal agency’s wolf recovery coordinator, Bangs was the face of the polarizing wolf reintroduction, conducting thousands of international, national, state and local interviews and holding hundreds of highly charged meetings, all to explain the effort as part of a massive public outreach effort. At various times, depending on the stage of the reintroduction, he was heralded as a hero while simultaneously being denounced as a wolf lover or hater, depending on people’s perspective.