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Sunday, October 25, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Sacajawea seventh-grade artist wins city access cover design contest

Students 18 and under were invited to participate in a Wastewater Access Cover design contest and they responded in droves, with 280 students of all ages submitting designs in the contest sponsored by Spokane Arts, the City of Spokane, the Lands Council and The Spokesman-Review.

Sacajawea STEM program honored in national competition

Along with four other schools in Washington and 300 nationwide, Sacajawea’s STEM program was cited in the 10th annual Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest for its ability to “solve complicated issues that affect their communities by using STEM learning.”

Spokane Public Schools look to $495.3 million bond to rebuild 3 mid-century middle schools

Welcome to Glover Middle School, where the principal doesn’t wear a button-down shirt because his office is too warm, where students recently went five days without hot water and where asbestos lurks behind every wall. “You’d better step away from there,” joked teacher Danial Witkowski, who teaches robotics in a classroom that dates from when the school opened in 1959.

Sacajawea Middle School takes top Junior Lilac Parade honor

The Sacajawea Middle School band and drill team took the top prize in Saturday’s Junior Lilac Parade in downtown Spokane. The unit took home the event’s “grand sweepstakes” prize after it was judged the best among 31 bands that performed in the parade, said Jane Bateham-Smith, who serves as the parade’s judging chairwoman. The prize allows Sacajawea to represent the Junior Lilac Parade in Saturday’s Spokane Lilac Festival Parade.

Cougars confident heading into camp

LEWISTON – Aesthetically speaking, the setting was all that separated the first practice of Washington State’s 2014 football season from all those that preceded it under coach Mike Leach, and all that will follow. The Cougars returned to the two natural-grass fields of Lewiston’s Sacajawea Middle School to run nearly all the same drills in the same manner that they ran last spring, that they will run throughout the upcoming season and will run to prepare for a bowl game, should they return to the postseason as well. But hidden in the calculated monotony of practice was a drastic change in the Cougars since they first ventured away from campus for camp last season. In Leach’s third year as WSU football coach the players have experienced success, and have experienced his practice system long enough to run it almost sans coaching, executing, in Leach’s words, “at a faster rate because there’s not as much teaching involved.”

Cougars open camp in Lewiston

The Cougars returned to the two natural-grass fields of Lewiston’s Sacajawea Middle School to run nearly all the same drills in the same manner that they ran last spring, that they will run throughout the upcoming season and will run to prepare for a bowl game, should they return to the postseason as well.

Shawn Vestal: Sacajawea Middle School students prep for Junior Lilac Parade

It is a little after 7 a.m., and the sun is low and bright in the sky, and sprinklers are sprinkling, and garbage bins are parked at the curb, and it’s a beautiful morning in the neighborhood, and here come 200 boys and girls right down the middle of the street, banging their drums and blowing their horns, marching in step and swinging their instruments, their shadows long on the asphalt, delivering a funky, brassy wake-up call to all they pass. Good morning, “Jungle Boogie.”

Students from across region converge for Junior Lilac Parade

The sun shone on blaring clarinets and slide trombones as drum majors led the way for the annual Spokane Junior Lilac Parade Saturday. Dressed as zombies, fish and beach-goers, elementary and middle-school students bused downtown from nearly 40 schools throughout the region. They soaked up the attention as parade-goers lined the route waiting for their children, alma mater or favorite tune to come by.