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Friday, October 30, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Pols: Harassment claims ‘believable’

Claims of election-related intimidation and harassment in North Idaho’s Bonner and Boundary counties haven’t been confirmed by authorities, but for some local politicians, both Republican and Democrat, the claims are believable and reflective of hardened political views, writes S-R reporter Eli Francovich in today’s Spokesman-Review.

District 1: Politics heat up in Idaho’s northernmost legislative district

In Idaho’s northernmost legislative district, the legislator who made headlines when she displayed the Confederate battle flag at a local parade and visited occupiers of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge standoff in Oregon is fighting for re-election in a race that’s drawing attention across the state. Controversial Rep. Heather Scott, R-Blanchard...

Politics heat up in Idaho’s District 1 legislative races

Controversial Rep. Heather Scott, R-Blanchard, a first-term lawmaker who made a splash by visiting the occupiers at the Malheur Wildlife Refuge standoff in Oregon and displaying a Confederate battle flag during a local parade, is being challenged by Kate McAlister, president of the Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce, and the contest has focused much attention on Idaho’s northernmost legislative district.

Malloy: Dems target Redoubter Scott

In his Idaho Politics Weekly column, Chuck Malloy wonders if the Christian Redoubters who have moved into Bonner and Boundary counties can save their favorite candidate, state Rep. Heather Scott, R-Blanchard. Scott's race against Democrat Kate McAlister will show how much staying power the Redoubt movement has.

Of District 1 legislative races, the ‘American Redoubt’ and politics in North Idaho…

In Idaho’s northernmost legislative district, Republican Party politics has been pulled farther to the right in recent years with the rise of the tea party. But now a new element is pushing the party farther still: the arrival of conservative Christian “preppers” fleeing more populated states, who see the region as a “redoubt” – a place to...

Redoubt movement helps push North Idaho politics to extreme right

In Idaho’s northernmost legislative district, Republican Party politics has been pulled farther to the right in recent years with the rise of the tea party. But now a new element is pushing the party farther still: the arrival of conservative Christian “preppers” fleeing more-populated states, who see the region as a “redoubt” – a place to settle and defend themselves when the whole country goes bad.

Idaho lawmakers pass Bible-in-schools bill, dismiss constitutional questions

Legislation saying the use of the Bible as a reference in Idaho’s public schools is “expressly permitted” passed the Idaho House on Monday and headed to the governor’s desk, though a February Idaho Attorney General’s opinion concluded it likely would be overturned in court, as it’s “specifically prohibited” by the Idaho Constitution.

Idaho lawmakers speak out on their visit to standoff in Burns

Three Idaho lawmakers spoke out Tuesday about their visit over the weekend to armed protesters who have taken over a federal wildlife refuge near Burns, Ore., saying the protesters’ grievances were being ignored before their “fact-finding mission.”

University of Idaho president proposes pay increase, tuition freeze

University of Idaho President Chuck Staben made waves in Boise last week by asking lawmakers to fully fund the 3 percent raises proposed for university employees next year – and offering in return to freeze undergraduate resident tuition, which has been rising each year for more than two decades. Gov. Butch Otter’s budget proposes having the state cover only part of the raises at the university. UI would have to come up with the extra money for raises for employees whose jobs are funded from other sources, including federal funds, grants, student tuition and fees, and endowment funds. At UI, that would come to $1.6 million next year. Staben said covering that would require a tuition increase.

Freshman legislator Dixon guides NRA license plate through process

BOISE – New North Idaho Rep. Sage Dixon introduced his first bill in the Legislature on Tuesday – to create a new specialty license plate to benefit the Friends of the NRA. Dixon, who let his NRA membership lapse about three years ago and isn’t a member of the friends group, said House Transportation Chairman Joe Palmer steered the group to him to let the freshman lawmaker carry the measure, which won unanimous support for introduction from the panel Tuesday.