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Monday, October 19, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Final fight: Condon, City Council spar over city salaries

On Dec. 30, Condon vetoed the City Council’s changes to the law that governs the Salary Review Commission – a board that sets the salaries of the mayor and city council members –dismayed it did not broaden the scope of the commission’s oversight.

Carlos Correa, Tommy Pham both win arbitration cases, players lead 3-1

Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa and Tampa Bay outfielder Tommy Pham have won their salary arbitration cases. The decisions gave players a 3-1 lead over teams in cases this winter. Correa was awarded a $5 million salary, rather than the $4.25 million offered by the Astros. Pham will get $4.1 million instead of the $3.5 million offered by the Rays.

Tensions swell over school salaries in Yakima Valley

Now that a nearly $1 billion court-approved funding package is being distributed to school districts in the Yakima Valley and the rest of the state, disputes are breaking out over how much should go to pay raises and how much should be spent on programs and services.

Spokane City Council gets pay raise in 2019, mayor’s salary stays flat

A volunteer panel of citizens handed the City Council and its leader raises of 3.5 percent and 6 percent, while keeping the mayor’s salary at $168,000. All are among the most well-paid elected officials in cities of similar size and type of government, according to research conducted by the review group.

‘Bargain now,’ Kennewick teachers demand. District says not so fast.

Hundreds of Kennewick teachers, nurses and other certificated workers rallied and marched Tuesday, saying the school district is getting millions more from the state for their salaries and benefits but isn’t passing it onto them. The educators wore red shirts and carried signs with messages like, “Teachers are role models, not doormats.”

Starbucks to add sick time, higher pay for store workers

Starbucks will provide paid sick time to its employees nationwide and give its 150,000 hourly and salaried U.S. workers another wage hike in April, just three months after its regular January pay increase, the company is announcing Wednesday.