Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Tuesday, October 20, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 40° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Water Cooler: Aging brains and how to keep them sharp

People often describe aging with the term “slowing down” not only to describe their day-to-day activities as kids grow up and careers turn into retirement, but also when it comes to their cognitive function.

Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer’s disease

An experimental blood test was highly accurate at distinguishing people with Alzheimer’s disease from those without it in several studies, boosting hopes there soon might be a simple way to help diagnose this most common form of dementia.

Medicare premiums going up $5 a month for 2013

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare premiums are going up $5 a month in 2013, the government said Friday. It's less than expected, but still enough to eat up about one-fourth of a typical retiree's cost-of-living raise next year. Medicare chief Marilyn Tavenner said the new "Part B" premium for outpatient care will be $104.90 a month. In most cases, it's deducted directly from a beneficiary's monthly Social Security check. Currently the premium is $99.90 a month.

Aging drivers present new transportation challenge

WASHINGTON (AP) — Baby boomers started driving at a young age and became more mobile than any generation before or since. They practically invented the two-car family and escalated traffic congestion when women began commuting to work. Now, 8,000 of them are turning 65 every day, and those retirements could once again reshape the nation's transportation. How long those 74 million people born between 1946 and 1964 continue to work, whether they choose to live in their suburban houses after their children leave home or whether they flock to city neighborhoods where they are less likely to need a car will have important ramifications for all Americans.

Aging boomers present transportation challenges

WASHINGTON (AP) — An analysis of government travel data says baby boomers have had a profound impact on transportation in the U.S. The analysis, released Thursday by AARP, an advocacy group for older Americans, says boomers started driving at a young age and became more mobile than any generation before or since. Baby boomers are people born between 1946 and 1964.

Even fit baby boomers won’t escape heart problems

CHICAGO (AP) — Here's a reality check for health-conscious baby boomers: Even among those in good shape, at least 1 in 3 will eventually develop heart problems or have a stroke. The upside is that that will happen about seven years later than for their less healthy peers.

Study: Privatized Medicare would raise premiums

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly six in 10 Medicare recipients would pay higher premiums under a hypothetical privatized system along the lines of what Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has proposed, according to a study released Monday. The report by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation also found striking regional differences that could lead to big premium hikes in some states and counties. That finding instantly made it ammunition in the presidential campaign.

Strong bones are vital as we age

This year I had my first bone density test, a simple scan (like an X-ray) done on the hips and spine to predict how dense, or strong, bones throughout the body are. I passed, but after my type of cancer treatment I am at a greater risk of having thin bones (osteopenia), so I am taking steps now to keep my bones strong. If your bones are really thin, you have osteoporosis and a significantly greater risk of breaking a bone with a minor fall.

Alzheimer drug shows some promise in mild disease

BOSTON (AP) — Combined results from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug suggest it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months.

Older voters look beyond Medicare, Social Security

WASHINGTON (AP) — Get in line, Medicare and Social Security. Seniors, like just about everyone else, have money on their minds. Who wins the trust of seniors, a group that votes at a higher rate than any other, will be a deciding factor in the presidential election. That should be good news for Mitt Romney, because those 65 and older have backed the Republican candidate in both of the last two presidential elections.

Quitting driving: Families key but docs have role

WASHINGTON (AP) — Families may have to watch for dings in the car and plead with an older driver to give up the keys — but there's new evidence that doctors could have more of an influence on one of the most wrenching decisions facing a rapidly aging population. A large study from Canada found that when doctors warn patients, and tell driving authorities, that the older folks may be medically unfit to be on the road, there's a drop in serious crash injuries among those drivers.

Report: Premium hikes for top Medicare drug plans

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of seniors enrolled in some of the most popular Medicare prescription drug plans face double-digit premium hikes next year if they don't shop for a better deal, says a private firm that analyzes the highly competitive market. Seven of the top 10 prescription plans are raising their premiums by 11 percent to 23 percent, according to a report this week by Avalere Health.

Sniping from within GOP adds to Romney’s struggles

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitt Romney struggled to steady his presidential campaign on Friday, buffeted by an outbreak of sniping among frustrated Republicans, fresh evidence of a slide in battleground state polls and President Barack Obama's accusation that he was writing off "half the country" in pursuit of the White House. Republican running mate Paul Ryan drew boos at an AARP convention in New Orleans when he said Romney would repeal Obama's health care law, which closed a gap in coverage for seniors' prescription drugs. The Wisconsin congressman accused the administration of weakening Medicare and flinching from tough measures needed to stabilize Social Security's finances, adding that the president has "put his own job security over your retirement security."

Obama camp argues Romney video offends seniors

WOODBRIDGE, Va. (AP) — The presidential campaigns were trying to win older voters Friday with speeches before the AARP and a new video produced by President Barack Obama's campaign that argued rival Mitt Romney derides seniors behind closed doors. Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan, who was bringing along his 78-year-old mother for an appearance before the AARP's convention in New Orleans, reassured attendees that he and Romney care about senior citizens.

Romney tries to seize mantle of change

WASHINGTON (AP) — Now it's Mitt Romney who wants to be the candidate of change. Romney seized on President Barack Obama's comment that "you can't change Washington from the inside." Grasping for a way to right his campaign and appeal to independents, the Republican nominee said he has what it takes to end the nasty partisanship in the nation's capital.

Older drivers face confusing array of license laws

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerry Wiseman notices it's harder to turn and check his car's blind spots at age 69 than it was at 50. So the Illinois man and his wife took a refresher driving course, hunting tips to stay safe behind the wheel for many more years — a good idea considering their state has arguably the nation's toughest older-driver laws. More older drivers are on the road than ever before, and an Associated Press review found they face a hodgepodge of state licensing rules that reflect scientific uncertainty and public angst over a growing question: How can we tell if it's time to give up the keys?

AP IMPACT: Varied license laws for older drivers

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerry Wiseman notices it's harder to turn and check his car's blind spots at age 69 than it was at 50. So the Illinois man and his wife took a refresher driving course, hunting tips to stay safe behind the wheel for many more years — a good idea considering their state has arguably the nation's toughest older-driver laws. More older drivers are on the road than ever before, and an Associated Press review found they face a hodgepodge of state licensing rules that reflect scientific uncertainty and public angst over a growing question: How can we tell if it's time to give up the keys?

News Summary: Alzheimer drug may slow brain plaque

MORE DISAPPOINTMENT: Two major studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug show it doesn't stop mental decline, the latest setback in finding a treatment for the mind-robbing disease. HOPEFUL SIGN: There was a hint that the drug bapineuzumab, made by Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnson, might help if given sooner, before the disease has caused too much damage and memory loss.