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Tuesday, October 27, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Harrop: Trump as Caesar: They protest too much

I’m not taking bets that either side will sit down and read the play. But that could help any interested parties decide for themselves whether the presentation was unfair, unbalanced and irresponsible or merely, as the critic saw it, “great, nasty fun.”

Woman who stormed stage during ‘Julius Caesar’ is arrested

A New York production of Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” with a Trump-like character who is assassinated had a boisterous new scene this weekend: an activist who stormed the stage, yelling, “Do you want Trump to be assassinated?”

Theater refuses to buckle after ‘Caesar’ Trump criticism

Though the Public’s version of William Shakespeare’s classic play is unchanged from its 400-year-old original, the production portrays Caesar with a gold bathtub and a pouty Slavic wife. President Trump’s name is never mentioned.

Can Craig Shakespeare add another chapter to Leicester tale?

Like his famous namesake, English playwright William Shakespeare, Leicester City manager Craig Shakespeare is hoping he can add a few blockbuster plays to his own story. Appointed caretaker manager after the English champion sacked Claudio Ranieri last month, Shakespeare has brought such a revival over three games that the 53-year-old will stay in the job until the end of the season.

Cost of Oregon Shakespeare Festival tickets increase

The price of tickets for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival is rising for 2017. The Mail Tribune reported Tuesday that tickets range from $67 to $140 for the season that opens Feb. 24, up from $65 to $123 last year. Like last year the cheapest section of seats will retail for $30.

Troupe travels with ‘Shrew,’ ‘Cyrano’ in tow

Montana Shakespeare in the Parks has been traveling the Western U.S. with its productions of the Bard’s great works since 1973. This year the troupe is bringing two productions to area parks – one is Shakespeare, the other not – and it’s the first time the troupe has appeared in either Spokane or Sandpoint.

Troupe travels with ‘Shrew,’ ‘Cyrano’ in tow

Montana Shakespeare in the Parks has been traveling the Western U.S. with its productions of the Bard’s great works since 1973. This year the troupe is bringing two productions to area parks – one is Shakespeare, the other not – and it’s the first time the troupe has appeared in either Spokane or Sandpoint.

Interplayers presents ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’

Early last week, “This American Life” host Ira Glass took to his Twitter account following a production of “King Lear” to announce to the world that “Shakespeare sucks,” calling the Bard “not relatable” and “unemotional.” Glass immediately suffered the slings and arrows of outraged English majors everywhere, and although he later retracted his comments, the Twitterverse seemed to be in agreement that he doth protest too much. Jeff Sanders, who is directing a production of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” that premieres tonight at Interplayers Theatre, takes particular umbrage with Glass’ criticism, as he believes the Bard’s legacy is so indelible precisely because it’s relatable.

Spokane’s Donohue excels in Shakespeare’s ‘Richard III’

ASHLAND, Oregon – Spokane native Dan Donohue is mesmerizing audiences this season as the title character in Shakespeare’s “Richard III” at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s outdoor Allen Elizabethan Theater. The 1984 Lewis and Clark High School graduate is playing to sold-out audiences, many of whom recall his past performances of Shakespeare’s dynamic characters at OSF, including Hamlet, Caliban, Iago and Mark Antony. Donohue grew up on the South Hill, played trumpet in the LC Band and was the school’s drum major.

Ashland sets stage for year-round drama

ASHLAND, Ore. – The Oregon Shakespeare Festival began in the 1930s as a strictly Shakespeare summer event. Over the decades it has expanded and branched out into a three-stage, year-round, $31 million annual operation that produces the Bard of Avon’s texts but also an array of younger plays for some 125,000 patrons. Current artistic director Bill Rauch has devoted more OSF resources than his predecessors to the commissioning and developing of new works – like the 2012 award-winning Lyndon B. Johnson biodrama, “All the Way,” by Seattle author Robert Schenkkan.

‘Abridged’ makes quick work of Bard’s works

Where would we be without William Shakespeare? So many elements from his stories have been borrowed and recycled so often that they’re now clichés, and he coined countless words and expressions that have long been part of the modern lexicon. More so than any other writer, Shakespeare’s work is inextricably linked to the way we speak and the way we tell stories today.

West Valley students to do ‘Nothing’

The West Valley High School drama department is presenting “Much Ado About Nothing,” by William Shakespeare today, tomorrow and Saturday. The play is at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 in advance or $8 at the door.