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Saturday, October 31, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Trench work at Downriver to remove old trees

A massive project to reduce stormwater and sewage flows into the Spokane River is going to force the removal of older trees along Columbia Circle and Downriver Golf Course in northwest Spokane. Some of the residents living in the area are calling for saving the trees, but city officials said the planned trench work will force them to replant the existing trees with new ones more appropriate for their locations.

Spokane area greening up

Spokane City Hall and neighborhood groups are gearing up again this year for new rounds of plantings in an effort to get 10,000 trees in the ground by the end of 2016. Neighborhood groups across the city are embracing the program, pitching in to plant new trees and shrubs and pledging to keep them watered as they grow.

Coeur d’Alene council approves resort’s plan to cut down maples

The Coeur d’Alene City Council voted Tuesday night in favor of changes in front of the Coeur d’Alene Resort, including cutting down street trees as a way to improve views of Lake Coeur d’Alene. The council voted 6-0 to approve Hagadone Hospitality Co.’s plans for about 2 acres of open space the resort must maintain for public use at its entrance.

Manito installs curvy sidewalk

There’s a new sidewalk on 25th Avenue along the south side of Manito Park, and its curves makes it different from most other sidewalks in town. Manito Park horticulture supervisor Steve Nittolo said the old sidewalk was sunken and broken, creating tripping hazards and collecting water and ice in the winter.

Inventory counts city’s trees, charts condition, evaluates role

As long as there have been cities, people have planted trees along streets, in parks and in yards. To better assess how Spokane street trees contribute to the city’s infrastructure and to attempt to put a dollar amount on the role the trees play – such as storm water mitigation – the Davey Resource Group has been hired to do a citywide street tree inventory.

Landscaping planned along section of Sprague

Members of the Spokane Valley Business Association seemed receptive to a plan to put in stormwater swales along Sprague Avenue between Thierman and Park roads during their meeting Wednesday, but they directed pointed questions to Spokane Valley staff members about plans to reduce the street from five lanes to four and reduce the number of driveways. The road will also be repaved during construction. In addition to filtering stormwater, the swales will help beautify that stretch of road, which is home to several vacant buildings, said Spokane Valley assistant stormwater engineer Ryan Brodwater. There currently isn’t any grass or landscaping in the area. “It’s a vast expanse of asphalt and concrete,” he said.

Cheney to update tree rules in Tree City USA bid

The city of Cheney last updated its tree ordinance in 1938 – back when residents had to be cautioned against letting their trees interfere with telegraph wires. The city is working to update that ordinance, part of the process to become a Tree City USA. Residents were invited to attend a Tree City USA open house last week at Veterans’ Memorial Park to discuss trees, take inventory of the trees in the park and offer suggestions for the new ordinance.

Group lends support to urban forest

Spokane Preservation Advocates, an organization that has fought to save historic buildings over the years, is branching out this month to preserve mature street trees. Members are concerned that Spokane city policies are encouraging small trees along city streets at the expense of big ones.

Preservation group advocating for old trees

Spokane Preservation Advocates, an organization that has fought to save historic buildings over the years, is branching out this month to preserve mature street trees. Members are concerned that Spokane city policies are encouraging smaller trees along city streets.

Mother plans living memorial for daughter

The trunks on some of the trees on Spokane's Overbluff Road bulge with what look like tumors. These trees have served the neighborhood well, providing shade and beauty for decades, but now they look worn out.