Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Thursday, October 29, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Day 60° Clear

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Then and Now: Sunset Trailer Park

The 1940s and ‘50s saw a whole class of transient workers dragging their homes behind their cars. The Sunset Trailer Park was counted by its residents as one of the best in the nation, welcoming weary travelers coming to Spokane from the West Plains.

The Modern finds Christmas at the trailer park

The wordy, unwieldy title of “The Great American Trailer Park Christmas Musical” tells you pretty much everything you need to know about the show: It’s an unruly, trashy, unapologetically ribald holiday comedy. It’s an ode to folding lawn chairs, crushed beer cans and nativity scenes rounded out by rogue Halloween decorations.

‘Trailer Park’ offers memorable moments

Lake City Playhouse’s production of “The Great American Trailer Park Musical” contains some stock characters with big personalities. From the exotic dancer to the wayward husband to the inmate’s wife, the cast plays them all with much vigor. With music and lyrics by David Nehls and book by Betsy Kelso, “Trailer Park” is upbeat and contemporary, poking fun at pop culture and the poor people who inhabit Armadillo Acres. This show may never be a classic like “The Sound of Music” or have the depth of “Rent,” but it is entertaining, although not for children.

Theater appeals to inner redneck

A raucous celebration of pink flamingos, plastic lawn furniture, trashy daytime television, processed food and cheap beer, “The Great American Trailer Park Musical” is the kind of show that announces its intentions in its lengthy, goofy title. Premiering Friday at Coeur d’Alene’s Lake City Playhouse (it last played regionally in 2008 at the Bing Crosby Theater), it’s a campy comedy that revels in stereotypes, bad taste and double-wide melodrama. “There’s a little bit of everybody that can relate to something in this show,” said the show’s director, Andy Renfrew. “I’m sure just about every person that watches the show can walk away saying, ‘That is so true,’ even though you don’t want to admit it.”

Theater appeals to inner redneck

A raucous celebration of pink flamingos, plastic lawn furniture, trashy daytime television, processed food and cheap beer, “The Great American Trailer Park Musical” is the kind of show that announces its intentions in its lengthy, goofy title. Premiering Friday at Coeur d’Alene’s Lake City Playhouse (it last played regionally in 2008 at the Bing Crosby Theater), it’s a campy comedy that revels in stereotypes, bad taste and double-wide melodrama. “There’s a little bit of everybody that can relate to something in this show,” said the show’s director, Andy Renfrew. “I’m sure just about every person that watches the show can walk away saying, ‘That is so true,’ even though you don’t want to admit it.”

Airway Heights Stabbing

Airway Heights Police Chief Lee Bennett describes the stabbing Monday night at the Rainbow Trailer Park.

Pop(-up) singer

Antsy McClain takes pride in his puffed-up pompadour, vintage leisure suit and working-class upbringing. All three are central to his stage persona as lead singer and songwriter for his longtime folkabilly band, the Trailer Park Troubadours.