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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Studies offer no clear answers on safety of cellphone use

Two government studies that bombarded rats and mice with cellphone radiation found a weak link to some heart tumors, but scientists and federal regulators say don’t worry – it is still safe to use your device.

A ‘sci-fi’ cancer therapy fights brain tumors, study finds

It sounds like science fiction, but a cap-like device that makes electric fields to fight cancer improved survival for the first time in more than a decade for people with deadly brain tumors, final results of a large study suggest.

Study: Aspirin may help treat some colon cancers

NEW YORK (AP) — Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug.

Bizarre tumor case may lead to custom cancer care

It's a medical nightmare: a 24-year-old man endures 350 surgeries since childhood to remove growths that keep coming back in his throat and have spread to his lungs, threatening his life. Now doctors have found a way to help him by way of a scientific coup that holds promise for millions of cancer patients. The bizarre case is the first use in a patient of a new discovery: how to keep ordinary and cancerous cells alive indefinitely in the lab.

New breast cancer clues found in gene analysis

NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists reported Sunday that they have completed a major analysis of the genetics of breast cancer, finding four major classes of the disease. They hope their work will lead to more effective treatments, perhaps with some drugs already in use. The new finding offers hints that one type of breast cancer might be vulnerable to drugs that already work against ovarian cancer.

Cancer makes event even more meaningful for Rose

Brigham Young University men’s basketball coach Dave Rose has always given his time generously to support cancer-stricken patients and assist fundraising for cancer research, but it’s taken on new meaning over the last 14 months. In June, 2009, Rose felt light-headed on a flight to Las Vegas. By the time the plane landed, Rose was sprawled over three seats and had to be helped from the cabin by emergency medical staff. He was vomiting blood when he reached the hospital. Doctors removed a softball-sized tumor from his spleen and also removed part of his pancreas and six lymph nodes. Two days after the surgery, he was told he had pancreatic cancer, which usually carries a bleak prognosis.