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Thursday, October 29, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Medical debts erased for 17,000 former Deaconess, Valley patients

The debt relief comes from a settlement between the Empire Health Foundation and Community Health Systems, which owned the Spokane-area hospitals from 2008 to 2017. On average, those benefiting from the settlement will have roughly $2,800 in debt wiped from their credit reports.

Settlement erases $50 million in medical debt for thousands of former patients at Deaconess, Valley hospitals

Tennessee-based Community Health Systems will forgive up to $50 million in debt for people who received treatment at the Spokane-area hospitals between Nov. 1, 2008, and June 30, 2017, when the company owned the facilities. The settlement comes more than two years after the Empire Health Foundation sued CHS, alleging the company failed to provide levels of charity care – free or discounted treatment for low-income patients – that it had promised when buying the hospitals.

Valley Hospital celebrates 50 years of community care

The name and affiliation might have changed over the years, but MultiCare Valley Hospital celebrates its 50th anniversary this year as a community hospital focused on serving the residents in the neighborhoods of Spokane Valley.

Shawn Vestal: Empire lawsuit just one more reminder of surreal hospital pricing

At the heart of the lawsuit against the former owners of two Spokane hospitals is a reminder of the freaky, shady way hospitals set prices. They seem to just … make them up. Or maybe it’s more accurate to say they set them very, very high as a kind of opening bid in a negotiation. The way the pricing scheme works says a lot about the unholy and opaque alliance between health care providers and insurers, one that drives up costs with an elaborate game of hide-the-ball-from-the-patient.

Shawn Reed: Don’t roll back progress on health care

The AHCA would mean we roll back the clock to patients relying on the ER – the one place they cannot be turned away – when the management of a chronic condition becomes so costly and unbearable they no longer can put it off.