Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Monday, October 19, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 56° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Man convicted in Portland train attacks must pay victims

PORTLAND – A judge on Wednesday ordered a man convicted of fatally stabbing two men who confronted him during a racist rant on a Portland, Oregon, light-rail train to pay $12,046 for expenses incurred by some of his victims.

Jamaican citizens sue exclusive Yellowstone Club over wages

Five Jamaican citizens who were recruited to work at a Montana ski resort for the ultra-rich just north of Yellowstone National Park say they and more than 100 other Jamaicans were discriminated against and paid less than other employees doing the same work.

Less pay growth among managers explains tepid U.S. wage gains

On its face, the latest job report showed annual pay gains weakened for American workers in September even as the unemployment rate slid to a fresh five-decade low. The guts of the report indicate it’s actually their bosses feeling the biggest pinch. Production and non-supervisory employees, who make up the bulk of workers, saw a slight step down in the pace of hourly earnings growth from September of last year-- up 3.5%, according to the Labor Department. Meanwhile, the 12-month gain in total wages, which includes those workers and their supervisors, unexpectedly cooled to 2.9% from 3.2%.

U.S. worker annual compensation slows slightly through June

The annual wages and benefits for U.S. workers rose in the second quarter at a slightly slower pace than the first, suggesting that the lowest unemployment levels in a half century have not triggered rapid gains in worker compensation.

Why wealth gap has grown despite record-long economic growth

After a full decade of uninterrupted economic growth, the richest Americans now hold a greater share of the nation’s wealth than they did before the Great Recession began in 2007. And income growth has been sluggish by historical standards, leaving many Americans feeling stuck in place.

100 Years Ago in Spokane: Miners get more pay

Miners in the Coeur d’Alene mining district got a boost in pay from $4.25 to $4.75 per shift. The move was announced at a meeting of the principal operators in Wallace, Idaho.

Uber, Lyft drivers protest across the U.S., overseas

Some drivers for ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft turned off their apps Wednesday to protest what they say are declining wages at a time when both companies are raking in billions of dollars from investors.

Hiring in U.S. slows sharply in February

The pace of hiring in the United States fell last month to its lowest point in nearly a year and a half, a surprise drop likely reflecting harsh weather and other temporary factors that led most economists to see the slowdown as a temporary blip.

World’s richest economies enjoy biggest pay raise in a decade

Workers in the world’s richest countries are getting their biggest pay bump in a decade, a step toward solving a labor market puzzle that’s unnerving central bankers. As shrinking unemployment in the U.S., Japan and euro zone finally forces companies to lift wages to retain and attract staff, JPMorgan Chase reckons pay growth in advanced economies hit 2.5 percent in the second quarter, the most since the eve of 2009’s worldwide recession. The bank predicts wages will accelerate to near 3 percent next year.