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Saturday, October 31, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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To prevent coronavirus, go beyond hand washing and moisturize, too

Are your hands painfully dry and cracked because you’ve been following the widespread advice to frequently wash them or apply hand sanitizer to prevent the spread of the coronavirus? If so, you should be aware of a less widely cited hygiene recommendation: to moisturize, as well.

Then and Now: Spokane Steam Laundry

The plentiful flow of the Spokane River gave the first settlers, S.R. Scranton and J.J. Downing, the idea to build a simple sawmill as early as 1871. Another early settler, Frederick Post, built a grist mill in 1876 to produce flour. Another flour processor, the Echo Mill, was built in 1883.

House Call: Hand-washing important step in disease prevention

It has taken nearly 200 years for hand-washing to be universally recognized as an excellent and simple way to dramatically curb the spread of disease. It is a great way to reduce your chances of getting or giving away a cold, the flu, food poisoning and other infectious diseases.

Firms, city settle over flaws at new fueling and washing center

Three construction and design firms will pay Spokane a total of $750,000 to fix flaws in the city’s new vehicle fueling and washing center. The Spokane City Council voted unanimously this week to accept the settlement, which was reached during mediation that started in June, said Rocky Treppiedi, an assistant city attorney.

City, county offer rebates for water-saving amenities

Think of it as cash for flushers – or credit, depending where you live. The city of Spokane and Spokane County unveiled new programs Thursday designed to cut the amount of water going into and out of homes by offering rebates to residents buying new Water Sense toilets or Energy Star washing machines to replace less-efficient appliances. Leaders from the two governments said it was part of the Indoor Water Conservation Program and an effort to protect the Spokane River and the aquifer the area taps for its water supply.

City, county offer incentives to save water

Think of it as cash for flushers – or credit, depending where you live. The City of Spokane and Spokane County unveiled new programs Thursday designed to cut the amount of water going into and out of homes by offering rebates to homeowners buying new Water Sense toilets or Energy Star washing machines to replace less-efficient versions of those appliances.

There’s nothing wily about feeding coyotes

Despite the aura of Washington State University, a few people in Pullman have managed to remain ignorant about wildlife. We’re talking about people with soft hearts and brains of mush.

American Lung Association settles with Northwest branch

SEATTLE – The American Lung Association has settled an eight-month legal dispute with its Seattle-based Northwest chapter and is getting back the $3.2 million regional headquarters the chapter had given to a newly created charity. Under terms announced Thursday, the entire board of directors at the Northwest chapter will be replaced, and the new charity – which had been established by the chapter’s since-fired chief executive – will return the building deed and $500,000 to the American Lung Association.

Judge rules against Lung Association chapter

SEATTLE – A judge has essentially put the Northwest chapter of the American Lung Association out of business after the chapter got into hot water for giving its Seattle headquarters and $600,000 to a different, newly created charity. In an order Monday, King County Superior Court Judge Regina Cahan said the American Lung Association was likely to win its claim that the regional affiliate breached its contract.

Digital archives bring history up to date

To research the brief political career of William Williams – a candidate for Lincoln County sheriff in 1894 – Nancy Ellis turned to her computer. Washington State Digital Archives helped her track down the relevant facts. Williams ran on the Populist ticket, won the election, but was never sworn in.

Bringing history up to date

To research the brief political career of William Williams – a candidate for Lincoln County sheriff in 1894 – Nancy Ellis turned to her computer. Washington State Digital Archives helped her track down the relevant facts. Williams ran on the Populist ticket, won the election, but was never sworn in.