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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Sacajawea seventh-grade artist wins city access cover design contest

Students 18 and under were invited to participate in a Wastewater Access Cover design contest and they responded in droves, with 280 students of all ages submitting designs in the contest sponsored by Spokane Arts, the City of Spokane, the Lands Council and The Spokesman-Review.

Ecology officials offer answers about controversial ‘variance’ for pollutants in Spokane River

State regulators hope to publish in the spring their proposed rules governing discharge of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, into the Spokane River. Businesses and governments say the limit imposed by the federal government, currently under review, is too stringent to be met with current technology, while conservation groups worry a new, less strict temporary standard won’t protect the health of the community.

U.S. mining sites dump 50M gallons of fouled wastewater daily

Every day many millions of gallons of water loaded with arsenic, lead and other toxic metals flow from some of the most contaminated mining sites in the U.S. and into surrounding streams and ponds without being treated, The Associated Press has found.

U.S. mining sites dump 50M gallons of fouled wastewater daily

Every day many millions of gallons of water loaded with arsenic, lead and other toxic metals flow from some of the most contaminated mining sites in the U.S. and into surrounding lakes and streams without being treated, the Associated Press has found.

Idaho town eyes pricey wastewater facility upgrade

Officials in the south-central Idaho city of Heyburn have agreed to move toward asking a judge to approve a bond to cover the cost of a major wastewater treatment upgrade rather than asking voters to approve the bond.

Wastewater treatment bond could bypass voters

Faced with a long list of expensive and necessary upgrades to the city’s wastewater treatment plant, Lewiston officials could soon ask a district judge to approve $28 million in bonding authority.

Spokane considers burning sewer sludge after outcry over fertilizer use

A study expected to be finished by the end of the year will explore the possibility of incinerating the solid material left over at the city’s waste water treatment plant at the Waste-to-Energy facility on the West Plains. The material had been used as fertilizer on area farms, but concerns have sprouted about harmful chemicals in the sludge seeping into the water table.

EPA sets hearing on Idaho’s plan to handle wastewater

The Environmental Protection Agency will visit Lewiston on Thursday to collect public comments on Idaho’s application to write and administer wastewater discharge permits in the state. Idaho is one of four states – along with Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New Mexico – that doesn’t administer its own version of the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System under the Clean Water Act. Instead, the EPA writes, administers and enforces permits that allow municipal wastewater plants, industrial facilities and other producers of pollution to discharge treated water into the state’s lakes, steams and rivers.

Company uses wastewater and algae for biofuel, fertilizer

Clearas Water Recovery, a Missoula tech company, has developed a patented process to use algae to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from public wastewater treatment plants, keeping waterways from being inundated with the compounds that starve fish and plant life of oxygen. In turn, the algae can be sold to other companies for fertilizer, biofuels and other uses.