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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Charleston weighs wall as seas rise and storms strengthen

CHARLESTON, South Carolina – Vickie Hicks, who weaves intricate sweetgrass baskets in this city’s historic city market, remembers climbing onto the table at her grandmother’s booth downtown when the floodwaters rushed by.

Iota threatens 2nd hurricane strike for Nicaragua, Honduras

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Tropical Storm Iota was strengthening in the Caribbean Sea on Saturday, threatening a second major hurricane strike for Nicaragua and Honduras, countries recently clobbered by a Category 4 Hurricane Eta.

Ask Dr. Universe: How does land affect the weather?

We get different weather patterns depending on a few conditions, such as how much sun the land gets, if the land is near mountains or ocean, and how air circulates through the atmosphere.

Climate researcher encouraged by weather

The Pacific Northwest is coming out of a short dry spell and returning to weather patterns that are more typical of La Nina winters, according to climate experts.

2012 hurricane season another for the record books

MIAMI (AP) — The 2012 hurricane season has come to an end and it's another one for the record books, above and beyond the destruction of Sandy. There were 19 named storms in what meteorologists consider an above-average year that tied as being the third most-active season since 1851.

Extreme weather tough on transportation system

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wild weather is taking a toll on roads, airports, railways and transit systems across the country. That's leaving states and cities searching for ways to brace for more catastrophes like Superstorm Sandy that are straining the nation's transportation lifelines beyond what their builders imagined.

US roads, airports unready for extreme weather

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's lifelines — its roads, airports, railways and transit systems — are getting hammered by extreme weather beyond what their builders imagined, leaving states and cities searching for ways to brace for more catastrophes like Superstorm Sandy. Even as they prepare for a new normal of intense rain, historic floods and record heat waves, some transportation planners find it too politically sensitive to say aloud the source of their weather worries: climate change.

Scientists look at climate change, the superstorm

WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate scientist Michael Oppenheimer stood along the Hudson River and watched his research come to life as Hurricane Sandy blew through New York. Just eight months earlier, the Princeton University professor reported that what used to be once-in-a-century devastating floods in New York City would soon happen every three to 20 years. He blamed global warming for pushing up sea levels and changing hurricane patterns.

Crippled NYC subways could hamper storm recovery

NEW YORK (AP) — The floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history. Critical electrical equipment could be ruined. Track beds could be covered with debris. Corrosive salt water could have destroyed essential switches, lights, turnstiles and the power-conducting third rail.

World matched record for hottest September _ again

WASHINGTON (AP) — Something about September keeps bringing out the record heat in the world. The globe last month matched a record for the hottest September, set in 2005. It was the third time since 2000 that the world set or tied a heat record for September. In addition to 2012 and 2005, previous hot September records were set in 2003. And these records go back to 1880.