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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Chuck Yeager, 1st to break sound barrier, dies at 97

Retired Air Force Brig. Gen. Charles “Chuck” Yeager, the World War II fighter pilot ace and quintessential test pilot who showed he had the “right stuff” when in 1947 he became the first person to fly faster than sound, has died. He was 97.

Pearl Harbor dead remembered in ceremony shrunk by pandemic

U.S. servicemen and women and National Park Service officials gathered at Pearl Harbor on Monday to remember those killed in the attack — but elderly survivors stayed home to pay their respects from afar to avoid health risks from the coronavirus pandemic.

Dec. 7, 1941: The ships at Pearl

Japan attacked the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 79 years ago today. Several of the ships damaged or sunk that morning returned to service, thanks to heroic efforts by officers, sailors and repair contractors.

Amid coronavirus, survivors of Pearl Harbor remember at home this year

Navy sailor Mickey Ganitch was getting ready to play in a Pearl Harbor football game as the sun came up on Dec. 7, 1941. Instead, he spent the morning — still wearing his football padding and brown team shirt — scanning the sky as Japanese planes rained bombs on the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

Germany marks 75th anniversary of landmark Nuremberg trials

Seventy-five years ago, the dock of Courtroom 600 of the Nuremberg Palace of Justice was packed with some of the most nefarious figures of the 20th Century: Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess, Joachim von Ribbentrop and 18 other high-ranking Nazis.

UN failures on coronavirus underscore the need for reforms

UNITED NATIONS – The coronavirus that has claimed nearly 1 million lives has underscored the failure of the United Nations to bring countries together to defeat it, prompting renewed calls to reform the world body so that it can meet challenges far different – and more daunting – than those it faced at its birth.

Inland Northwest Opera and MAC combine music and history

When Dawn Wolski left her South Hill home en route to the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture on Saturday afternoon, it appeared that life was imitating art. The sky was hazy and smoky. The air quality was hazardous. However, the general and artistic director of Inland Northwest Opera braved the elements.

75th anniversary of end of WWII is mostly virtual amid virus

When Japanese military leaders climbed aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on Sept. 2, 1945, the battleship was packed with U.S. sailors eager to see the end of World War II. On Wednesday, the 75th anniversary of the surrender, some of those same men who served the United States will not be able to return to the Missouri in Hawaii’s Pearl Harbor because of the world’s new war against the coronavirus.

104-year-old Spokane Valley veteran of World War II dies

Alfred Ronald Hemming, a member of a shrinking set of surviving veterans of World War II and an electrical worker who helped modernize the landing facilities at Spokane's Felts Field, died Wednesday. He was 104. 

Congress awards its highest honor to USS Indianapolis crew

Congress has awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, its highest honor, to surviving crew members of the USS Indianapolis, the ship that delivered key components of the first nuclear bomb and was later sunk by Japan during World War II.

Hiroshima court recognizes atomic bomb ‘black rain’ victims

A Japanese court on Wednesday for the first time recognized people exposed to radioactive “black rain" that fell after the 1945 U.S. atomic attack on Hiroshima as atomic bomb survivors, ordering the city and the prefecture to provide the same government medical benefits as given to other survivors.

Holocaust survivors urge Facebook to remove denial posts

Holocaust survivors around the world are lending their voices to a campaign launched Wednesday targeting Facebook head Mark Zuckerberg, urging him to take action to remove denial of the Nazi genocide from the social media site.

German court convicts former concentration camp guard, 93

A German court on Thursday convicted a 93-year-old former SS private of being an accessory to murder at the Stutthof concentration camp, where he served as a guard in the final months of World War II. He was given a two-year suspended sentence.