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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Author Junot Diaz withdraws from festival amid allegations

Author Junot Diaz has withdrawn from a writers’ festival in Australia after fellow writers accused him of past sexual misconduct and misogyny, organizers said Saturday, adding that a moment of reckoning had arrived for the Pulitzer Prize winner.

Poet Marie Howe will discuss writing, spirituality and doubt in Spokane talks

Poet Marie Howe has been trying to write about Mary Magdalene for more than 30 years. Her fascination with the biblical figure goes back even further. “Like many women, I grew up with the stories in the Old and New Testament,” Howe said. “Mary Magdalene was the woman I most identified with – and even as a girl I knew something wasn’t right with the story as it was told.”

Outdoor writing contest: Special Place

As I stand in the center of the ring of trees I know so well, a gentle breeze washes over the quickly darkening forest, blowing my long brown hair to the side.

Outdoor writing runner-up: Buck Fever

The weather in the middle of August in Spokane was guaranteed to be hot and dry. Especially in the late afternoon, which was time to go hunting.

Outdoor writing winner: A Taste of Flight

When I looked up to the sky, I did not see any blue. The azure heavens had been replaced with a mosaic of rich reds, glowing greens, cool cobalts, pastel purples, all dancing around one another in a labyrinth of patchwork patterns.

Outdoor Writing Contest 2017 winners announced

A story by Sydney Lyman, a junior at Mead High School, has been judged the best of 111 entries to win The Spokesman-Review’s 2017 Outdoor Writing Contest for high school students.

New American Writers Museum narrates Great American Story

The American Writers Museum, seven years in the making, is an endeavor even the most daring author might shy from: How, on a single floor of an office building, do you tell the story of centuries of American language?