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Friday, October 18, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Stories tagged: medical research


Scientists Discover Gene Required To Develop Normal Breathing Finding May Lead To Understanding Of Breathing Disorders, Sids

Scientists have identified a gene required for development of normal breathing, which could lead to better understanding of respiratory problems such as sleep apnea and sudden infant death syndrome. Researchers …


Prostate Drug Found To Be Almost Worthless Hytrin Beats Proscar In High-Stakes Prostate Drug Comparison

The first head-to-head comparison of the nation’s two most popular medicines for prostate trouble found that one gives significant relief while the other is virtually worthless. The two medicines, Hytrin …


Estrogen Pills Lower Women’s Risk To Get Alzheimer’s Disease

Women who take estrogen supplements to reduce the symptoms of menopause may gain an added benefit, new research suggests: a lowered risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease. In the most convincing …


Unfaithfulness, Cervical Cancer Tied Men With Many Sexual Partners Carry Home Cancer-Linked Virus

Unfaithful husbands may give their wives cancer. That’s the conclusion of a study that found women are five to 11 times more likely to develop cervical cancer if their men …


Study Ties Breast Milk To Fewer Infections

Pediatricians know that the best formula for a baby is mother’s milk. But new, carefully designed studies have suggested that breast milk is not only better but almost twice as …


Overcooking Meats Can Be Just As Harmful As Undercooking Them

It sounds like a flipflop, but it’s not. For years, scientists have been warning us of the dangers of undercooked meat. Now studies suggest that the more we cook meat, …


Chemo An Option For Throat Cancer

Chemotherapy that preserves a patient’s voice box and ability to speak is just as effective as surgery in treating some types of throat cancer, a study suggests. Cancer experts say …


Study Supports More Frequent Mammograms Tumors Can Grow Rapidly In Young Women, Requiring More Screening, Researchers Find

A study found breast tumors in younger women can grow rapidly - from too-small-to-be-detected to large - in less than two years, suggesting that those worried about cancer should get …


Vitamin C Good For Smokers

Injections of vitamin C given to smokers reverse one of the most harmful cardiovascular effects of smoking, according to a study being published today. However, more research is needed to …


Virus Turns Cholera Into Killer Illness Virus Causes Harmless Bacteria To Manufacture Deadly Poison

Harmless forms of cholera bacteria are turned into killers when they are infected by a virus that switches on a poison-making gene, according to new research. The true villain in …


New Life May Help Save Others Research Finds Benefits To Umbilical Cord Blood

During the course of a pregnancy, expectant parents have many decisions to make. Should they undergo prenatal testing? Should mom breast-feed? Should a son be circumcised? Add a new consideration …


Sperm-Making Cells Can Be Frozen, Transplanted Technique Could Be Used For Infertile Men, Saving Endangered Animals

Scientists have successfully transplanted sperm-making cells between species, raising the possibility someday of using animals to produce sperm for infertile men. They have also found that the sperm-making cells can …


Pollutants May Cause Brain Damage

A family of common environmental pollutants already suspected of contributing to reproductive problems may also cause brain damage, learning disorders and other problems in children, scientists say. Evidence suggests that …


Farmers May Soon Produce Organs

Researchers are looking to the day when farm animals could provide organs to be transplanted into humans. Scientists at the University of Missouri-Columbia hope to learn how to reprogram a …


Getting A Second Shot WSU Veterinarians Developing Treatment To Avoid Having To Shoot Injured Racehorses

Equine E.R. WSU veterinary students and staff use a winch to load a sedated racehorse into a special “horse ambulance.” Photo by Kristy MacDonald/The Spokesman-Review


Frozen Graves May Hold Answers To Epidemic Researchers Hope To Dig Up Disease That Killed 20 Million

A research team plans to exhume seven bodies from permafrost in hopes of finding what caused a global epidemic that killed 20 million people in 1918 and 1919. The 1918 …


Azt Helps Reduce Hiv Risk For Newborns Women Who Took The Drug Less Likely To Have Babies With Virus

HIV-positive women who took AZT while pregnant were significantly less likely to deliver babies with the virus, researchers said Tuesday. But in another study, some pregnant, HIV-positive women offered AZT …


Report: Young Athletes Prone To Eating Disorders

Many young athletes, ranging from thin, graceful gymnasts to stocky, powerful wrestlers, are endangering their health by going to extremes to control their weight, doctors warn. Many develop eating disorders …


Retin-A Found To Help Shrink Stretch Marks When Applied In Early Stages

Retin-A can help self-conscious teenagers get past acne and soften the wrinkles of the middleaged. Now, researchers say, it may shrink stretch marks from pregnancy or obesity. Tretinoin, the active …


Research Suggests Retina Is Body Clock

The daily shedding and regrowth of cells in the retina nerve of the eye may help control the sleep cycle and guide the body’s perception of the passage of time, …


Smoking, Obesity Can Harm Fetuses

Both smoking and obesity can harm unborn children, according to separate studies released Tuesday. Pregnant women who smoke are 50 percent more likely to have mentally retarded children, according to …


Male Doctors Less Likely To Give Physical Breast Exams

Male doctors are less likely than their female colleagues to give women physical breast exams, a study has found. That is a problem because a physical exam can find signs …


Student Dies After Exam For Research Volunteer May Have Been Given Too Much Cough Suppressant

Human trials in a research project on effects of smoking and air pollution were halted because a young student volunteer died after an ordinarily routine examination. The student was given …


Teens Respond To Cigarette Ads

Teenagers are three times as likely as adults to respond to cigarette ads, and 79 percent of teen smokers puff brands depicted by the Marlboro Man, Joe Camel and the …


Scientists Tracking Down Manic-Depression Genes

Scientists who launched an all-points search for manic-depression genes say they’ve found five possible hideouts. Further work might reveal the genes themselves, a step toward finding better treatments for a …


Ibuprofen May Cut Risk Of Alzheimer’s 14-Year Study Of Elderly Says Risk Of Disease Drops Up To 60%

Ibuprofen, the drug contained in such pain relievers as Advil, Motrin and Nuprin, may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by up to 60 percent, researchers reported Thursday. Aspirin …


New Treatment

Some cases of cystic fibrosis might be treatable with the breathtakingly simple weapon of antibiotics, a test-tube study suggests. Antibiotics are used now to treat lung infections that result from …


Vitamin E May Cut Risk Of Heart Disease By 75%

For years, researchers have suspected that vitamin E might protect against serious heart disease, but they lacked proof - until now. A British study, reported on Monday in Orlando, Fla., …


Study Shows Black Tea Could Lower Stroke Risk Flavonoid Intake Beneficial, But More Research Needed

Instead of tea and crumpets, try tea and apples - it could reduce your risk of stroke, a new European study suggests. Long-term consumption of black tea - the kind …


New Crop? WSU Gets $70,000 To Study Marijuana Growing

It may field quips about “higher” education, but Washington State University is getting $70,000 in taxpayer money to study growing marijuana for medical purposes. The money was contained in successful …