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Tuesday, July 7, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Stories tagged: medicine


Scientists call on U.S. to allow research on pot meds for pets

People anxious to relieve suffering in their pets are increasingly turning to oils and powders that contain CBDs, a non-psychoactive component of marijuana. But there’s little data on whether they …


Scene of an anatomy: Lab offers students an inside look at human health

Students at the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine were in their third week of what may be, to outsiders, one of the strangest parts of medical school curriculum: dissecting …


100 years ago: Horseradish, borax and boiling water advised for ‘tanned or freckled’ shoulders (and other beauty tips)

The Spokesman-Review’s Sunday magazine was full of health and beauty tips, including this: “If the shoulders have become tanned or freckled, they should be treated twice a day with some …


States expand investigation of opioid makers, distributors

Attorneys general from most states are broadening their investigation into the opioid industry as a nationwide overdose crisis continues to claim thousands of lives.


100 years ago in Spokane: Wife disputes doctor’s claim that he gave man prescriptions for liquor to ease broken leg pain

Two stories in The Spokesman-Review illustrated the difficulty of enforcing the state’s prohibition laws. In the first story, Spokane County Sheriff George Reid said that he found evidence that one …


Testing probe to help cancer surgeons know they got it all

Patients emerging from cancer surgery want to know, “Did you get it all?” Now scientists are developing a pen-like probe to help surgeons better tell when it’s safe to stop …


Lasker Awards honor Planned Parenthood and research on preventing and fighting cancer

Planned Parenthood, the embattled nonprofit health provider that specializes in reproductive health, has won the 2017 Lasker Award for public service.


United States gives Ethiopia $91 million in drought aid for food and medicine

The United States will provide an additional $91 million in humanitarian aid for Ethiopia to cope with a third straight year of drought, the top U.S. official in charge of …


UPDATED: Wed., Aug. 30, 2017

U.S. clears breakthrough gene therapy for childhood leukemia

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients’ own blood cells to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. The move opens a new era in …


First gene therapy – ’a true living drug’ – on the cusp of FDA approval

When doctors saw the report on Bill Ludwig’s bone-marrow biopsy, they thought it was a mistake and ordered the test repeated. But the results came back the same: His lethal …


UPDATED: Mon., July 10, 2017

Providence Health planning layoffs; Spokane impact unclear

Providence Health & Services plans layoffs after posting an operating loss.


Trump presses Congress on health care bill: Get it done

President Donald Trump pressed Congress on Monday to get health care done before leaving for its long August recess, even as Republican senators say the GOP effort so far to …


UPDATED: Tue., July 11, 2017

Coffee drinkers live longer, have lower risk of disease, studies find

Coffee drinkers live longer, according to two large-scale studies released Monday that add to extensive research indicating coffee consumption is associated with better health.


GOP leader says he’ll rework health bill, but offers Plan B

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he plans to produce a fresh bill in about a week scuttling and replacing much of President Barack Obama’s health care law. But he’s …


FDA approves first new drug in 20 years for sickle cell

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug in nearly 20 years for sickle cell, an inherited disease in which abnormally shaped red blood cells can’t properly …


Opioid prescribing is falling in the US, but not everywhere

Overall opioid prescription rates have been falling in recent years, but the powerful drugs have become more plentiful in more than than 1 in 5 U.S. counties, a report released …


Oregon approves measure requiring insurers to cover abortion

Insurance companies in Oregon would be required to cover abortions and other reproductive services at no cost to the patient regardless of income, citizenship status or gender identity under a …


GOP lawmakers launch fight against Oregon’s new health tax

Three Republican lawmakers have set the stage for a possible ballot fight next year that could overthrow Oregon’s new multimillion-dollar health care tax before it can take effect.


Brit prime minister declines to intervene in baby Charlie case

Prime Minister Theresa May on Wednesday declined to intervene in the case of a sick British 10-month-old whose parents were legally blocked from taking him to a treatment trial in …


Popular stomach acid blockers linked to higher death rates

A higher risk of death is associated with long-term use of popular stomach acid reducers known as proton pump inhibitors, according to a study of prescribed drugs published Monday.


State audit: Benefits of state-run health clinics unclear

Montana opened its first government-run health clinics five years ago. It was touted as a bold experiment and a possible national model in providing low-cost health care to government workers. …


UPDATED: Thu., June 29, 2017

GOP may keep some Obama tax increases to save health bill

Senate Republican leaders considered keeping one of former President Barack Obama’s big tax increases on wealthier Americans and using the money to fatten proposed subsidies for the poor in a …


UPDATED: Thu., June 29, 2017

Walgreens scraps Rite Aid takeover, will buy stores instead

Walgreens Boots Alliance is scrapping its deal to buy all of rival Rite Aid and instead will buy a smaller piece of the drugstore chain, after the original takeover effort …


UPDATED: Wed., June 28, 2017

Senate leaders scramble for deal on health care bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell explored options for salvaging the battered Republican health care bill Wednesday but confronted an expanding chorus of GOP detractors, deepening the uncertainty over whether the …


Medicaid mission creep threatens GOP’s ‘Obamacare’ repeal

Somewhere along the way, the Republican crusade to repeal “Obamacare” also turned into an effort to limit the future growth of Medicaid. That bit of mission creep is complicating prospects …


UPDATED: Tue., June 20, 2017

Researchers say they’ve unlocked key to cancer metastasis and how to slow it

Hasini Jayatilaka was a sophomore at the Johns Hopkins University working in a lab studying cancer cells when she noticed that when the cells become too densely packed, some would …


U.S. could have twice as many Alzheimer’s cases, study suggests

Alzheimer’s disease begins years before mental deterioration is detected, suggests a new study that could result in doubling the estimated number of people with the neurodegenerative disease.


High court ruling speeds up generic biotech drug approval

The Supreme Court is speeding up the time for generic biotech drugs to become available to the public. The court’s unanimous ruling Monday means a loss of billions in sales …


AMA tackles sexual abuse – of doctors, by doctors

The American Medical Association will no longer tolerate sexual misconduct by physicians – at least if their victims are other doctors, and if the abuse occurs at an AMA event.


UPDATED: Wed., May 17, 2017

Blood tests may have significantly underestimated lead levels, FDA and CDC warn

Federal officials are warning that some blood tests may have “significantly” underestimated lead levels, and they are urging the retesting of some children, as well as pregnant and breast-feeding women.