Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Tuesday, October 22, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 55° Partly Cloudy

Tags


Everything tagged


Sort by:

Stories tagged: medicine


CDC backs breast-feeding, despite false story

A widely shared story that U.S. health officials are recommending a delay in breast-feeding to improve vaccine effectiveness is false.


GOP proposal could shrink health coverage for those with pre-existing conditions

A White House push to let states waive mandatory coverage and rate requirements under the Affordable Care Act could jeopardize health insurance gains for millions of adults with pre-existing medical …


Zika poses even greater risk for birth defects than was previously known, CDC reports

About 1 in 10 pregnant women infected with Zika in the United States last year had a baby or fetus with serious birth defects, according to a study released Tuesday …


UPDATED: Tue., April 4, 2017, 8:32 p.m.

White House effort to revive health bill gets mixed reaction

A White House offensive to resurrect the moribund House Republican health care bill got an uneven reception Tuesday from GOP moderates and conservatives, leaving prospects shaky for the party to …


Vaccinations significantly reduce flu death risk, CDC study finds

Children who were vaccinated in recent years significantly lowered their chances of dying from the flu, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Staggering increase in U.S. heroin use has hit young, white men hardest

Heroin use – which has been at the epicenter of a ruthless and relentless opioid epidemic sweeping the country – has increased fivefold over a decade, and dependence on the …


Lead exposure alters children’s lives decades later, study indicates

Children with elevated blood-lead levels at age 11 ended up as adults with lower cognitive function and lower-status occupations than their parents, according to research that offers one of the …


This woman is growing a second skeleton – and it’s locking her inside her own body

Jasmin Floyd was on her way to kindergarten in northeastern Connecticut, buckled into the back seat of her mother’s car. On the way, she called out, “Mommy, my neck hurts,” …


Venezuela asks U.N. help in boosting medicine supplies

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro has asked the United Nations for “help” boosting medicine supplies as he struggles to combat crippling shortages.


FDA links very rare cancer, 9 deaths, to breast implants

Nine deaths from a very rare kind of cancer have been linked to breast implants, indicating a very low but increased risk in women with implants, according to the U.S. …


Oregon midwife charged with delivering babies in Kennewick without a license

An Oregon woman who has been a midwife for four decades is accused of illegally delivering at least two babies in Kennewick.


Group introduces bill covering abortion laws in Idaho

A prominent anti-abortion group in Idaho has introduced legislation reversing two abortion laws at the center of a legal battle.


Birth defects in Zika pregnancies 20 times higher than in pre-Zika years, CDC says

Pregnancies of women in the United States infected with the Zika virus are about 20 times more likely to result in babies with certain birth defects compared to the prevalence …


Old mold from penicillin discoverer auctioned for $14,617

How much is an old, dried out piece of mold worth? Apparently more than $14,600 if it was created by the doctor who discovered penicillin. The nearly 90-year-old swatch of …


Bill telling women abortion can be halted introduced

An Idaho Senate panel has introduced legislation requiring the state to distribute information telling women that a drug-induced abortion may be halted halfway through, despite physicians warning there’s not enough …


Zika may be spread by 35 species of mosquitoes, researchers say

Zika may be spread by as many as 35 species of mosquitoes, including seven found in the United States, according to a predictive model created by University of Georgia ecologists …


Can marijuana ease the opioid epidemic?

After a 12-year battle with debilitating abdominal conditions that forced her to stop working, marijuana has helped Lynn Sabulski feel well enough to look for a job. Sabulski is among …


UPDATED: Mon., Feb. 27, 2017, 4:52 p.m.

The dirty dozen: U.N. issues list of 12 most worrying bacteria

The World Health Organization has issued a list of the top dozen bacteria most dangerous to humans, warning that doctors are fast running out of treatment options. In a press …


Trump urges insurers to work together to ‘save Americans from Obamacare’

President Donald Trump met with major health insurers Monday morning, in the midst of intensifying public pressure to preserve the law and political divisions over how to best dismantle and …


Rise in mumps outbreaks prompts officials to weigh third vaccine dose

Federal health officials are evaluating the benefit of an additional dose of the mumps vaccine because of the increasing number of mumps outbreaks since 2006. More than 5,000 cases of …


FDA urged to let abortion pill be sold at pharmacies

The so-called abortion pill – now dispensed only in clinics, hospitals and doctors’ offices – should be made available by prescription in pharmacies across the U.S., according to a group …


Testosterone therapy benefits elusive, major studies find

Testosterone therapy for older men possibly could provide some benefit, but there are also signs it could cause harm, according to a major series of studies published Tuesday. The five …


Obamacare repeal would gut opioid treatment gains, study finds

A new study by Harvard Medical School and New York University shows that repealing the Affordable Care Act would cut $5.5 billion a year for substance-abuse and mental health treatment, …


Researchers may have a way to predict autism, national study indicates

Measuring changes in infants’ brain growth can allow doctors to predict the likelihood that they will be diagnosed with autism in their toddler years, according to research published Wednesday by …


Dementia joins ranks of top global killers with no drug in sight

Dementia has unseated AIDS as one of the world’s top killers, new figures from the World Health Organization show, as drugmakers struggle to either curb or cure it.


Justices: Makers have duty to warn hospitals about devices

The Washington Supreme Court says a lower court erred when it didn’t tell a jury that a manufacturer had a duty to warn the hospital about its products.


More than 350 organizations write President Trump to endorse current vaccines’ safety

More than 350 organizations, including leading U.S. medical, advocacy and professional organizations, have sent a letter to President Donald Trump expressing their “unequivocal support for the safety of vaccines.”


Senate panel introduces new school vaccine opt-out bill

An Idaho Senate panel has introduced legislation that would allow parents simply to write a letter excusing their children from vaccines rather than fill out a governmental form. The Times-News …


Feds sue Idaho doctor over missing pills, sloppy records

Federal prosecutors say an Idaho doctor’s sloppy records left thousands of regulated pills unaccounted for, but the physician says an employee stole the drugs.


Obamacare: Many are worried about potential health care loss, poll shows

Though “Obamacare” still divides Americans, a majority worry that many will lose coverage if the 2010 law is repealed in the nation’s long-running political standoff over health care. A new …