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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Sunday, February 23, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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EndNotes

He who conceals his disease cannot expect to be cured

A train crosses Lake Pend Oreille as it leaves Sandpoint on Tuesday morning. BNSF wants to build a parallel trestle by 2018. (Kathy Plonka)
A train crosses Lake Pend Oreille as it leaves Sandpoint on Tuesday morning. BNSF wants to build a parallel trestle by 2018. (Kathy Plonka)

…is an Ethiopian proverb. Perhaps when one conceals their disease from themselves, they can never begin to get well – find medication, support or change behaviors needed for healing.

Perhaps when one conceals their disease from the community, they are not part of a group who changes perceptions, advocates for cures. Together, we encourage each other, find hope.

In an interview on The Queen Latifah Show, the beautiful actress Rene Russo revealed her lifetime battle with bi-polar disorder. Another lovely face – like actress Catherine Zeta-Jones - now associated with a mental health illness.

Rene Russo's story may encourage others to get medical help, change how people perceive others who live with mental health disorders. And perhaps enough stories will lead to the longed-for cure.

(S-R photo: Lake Pend Oreille) 



Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.