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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper
Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883

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News >  WA Government

Bill that would make financial education a high school graduation requirement in Washington passes out of committee

If passed, House Bill 1915 would add financial education to the current list of state-mandated high school graduation requirements. It would not change the total number of credits students need to get their diplomas – 24 – but rather embed a half-credit’s worth of instruction into that existing credit total.in or before the 2027-28 school year.
News >  Pacific NW

How an endangered hawk could topple plans for WA’s largest wind farm

What began as the largest wind project ever proposed in Washington — the Horse Heaven Hills wind farm — will likely soon be cut to a fraction of the original vision. Why? Because more than 100 of the turbines, which could stand taller than the Space Needle, might pose a danger to a little-known and endangered species in the Tri-Cities area: the ferruginous hawk.
News >  Washington

How an endangered hawk could topple plans for WA’s largest wind farm

Feb. 21—What began as the largest wind project ever proposed in Washington — the Horse Heaven Hills wind farm — will likely soon be cut to a fraction of the original vision. Why? Because more than 100 of the turbines, which could stand taller than the Space Needle, might pose a danger to a little-known and endangered species in the Tri-Cities area: the ferruginous hawk. To protect the hawk, ...
News >  Washington

Low wages, high costs: WA prisoners say they’re being exploited

Feb. 21—People incarcerated by Washington have to work for as little as $1 per hour while paying unfair costs to stay healthy and connected with the outside world, says a new report by Columbia Legal Services based partly on survey responses and interviews with dozens of people in the state's prisons. Because incarcerated people can face negative consequences if they decline to work and ...
News >  Washington

WA Cares, if it survives, could benefit people who retire elsewhere

Feb. 21—OLYMPIA — State legislators are advancing a proposal that would let Washingtonians access benefits through the state's new long-term care insurance program, WA Cares Fund, even if they left the state for a new job or to retire. But the proposals are moving forward as WA Cares faces questions over its survival. A petition-backed initiative to the Legislature would make optional a ...