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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper
Sunday, December 16, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Everything is copy: Finding harder truths along the harder route

During the mediation, the officer said that while he had a slightly different memory of the exchange, his hasty words didn’t reflect what he’d meant, didn’t represent him. He wanted to tell me who he was: a father, an athlete, a coach, a 20-year member of the force, the product of an inter-racial family, a believer in justice and an admirer of Martin Luther King Jr., whose words about the content of one’s character he often re-read.
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Reading the Northwest: Book club authors share their 2018 favorites

The Spokesman-Review launched Northwest Passages just over a year ago as a book club and community forum with a mission to get people reading – and talking. If anything, we underestimated the passion of our readers, as crowds packed some of the biggest venues we could find to hear writers including Craig Johnson, creator of the Longmire mysteries; Jess Walter, the best-selling Spokane novelist; and Tara Westover, debut author of a celebrated memoir about overcoming her difficult upbringing in rural Idaho.
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Robert Caro reflects on his career in upcoming book

NEW YORK – Robert Caro’s next book isn’t his fifth and final volume on Lyndon Johnson or like anything he has done before. “Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing,” to be published by Alfred A. Knopf in April, combines personal reflections and professional guidance as Caro looks back on his singular history as a writer and reporter. The book includes previous lectures and interviews, but also new material. In the introduction, the 83-year-old Caro writes that the 240-page “Working” is not a “full-length memoir,” which he still hopes to write, but a more informal gathering of “thoughts” and “experiences” behind such prize-winning books as his Johnson biography “Master of the Senate” and his classic book on municipal builder Robert Moses, “The Power Broker.”

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American Life in Poetry: ‘Estelle’

Alaska Quarterly Review put out a special double issue late in 2017 to celebrate its 35th year, a very long tenure for a literary magazine. Among the many fine works I found there was this touching portrait of his mother by Michael Mark, who lives in California.
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Review: ‘This Will Only Hurt a Little,’ by Busy Philipps

Her Instagram followers will recognize the Philipps who just puts herself out there, the good, the bad, the falling flat on her face (three dislocated knees). Here I am, everybody! Do you love me? LOVE ME! And it’s hard not to. (Unless all-caps bothers you. Then you may have issues with this book.)
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Everything is Copy: The food chain

I’d decided to stop eating meat some years before she came into my life, and I had to figure out what would be OK to consume. Only plants? Nothing with a face? No one who runs away?
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American Life in Poetry: ‘Housewife as Poet’ by Sally Van Doren

Until about a hundred years ago, the worth of a poem was measured by how noble and elevated was its subject and its manner of delivery, but with the appearance of modernism all hell broke loose and suddenly there were all sorts of subjects one had license to write about.
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10 tips for travel as a political act

The great value of travel is the opportunity it offers you to pry open your hometown blinders and broaden your perspective. And when we implement that world view as citizens of our great nation, we make travel a political act. Here are my top 10 tips for doing just that:
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Six novels that get to the truth of World War I

Although few Americans made literature out of the First World War, European writers – men who served, women who waited and people who opposed the war – produced novels, memoirs and poetry that are still almost unbearable to read for their painful evocation of the battlefield and the emotional costs of war.
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American Life in Poetry: ‘The Cache’ by Dan Gerber

Squirrels hide many more acorns than they can find, and thus we have oaks. And a child might hide precious belongings, then hide the map that gives their location, then hide the clue to where the map is hidden. Dan Gerber, who lives in California, remembers just such a hiding place, as well as a place and time that’s far beyond finding.
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Reading the Northwest: Why Rick Steves sees travel as a political act

UPDATED: Mon., Nov. 5, 2018, 9:08 p.m.

Rick Steves has been guiding Americans through Europe for so many years, it’s like an old friend leading us along the ancient cobbled streets. His book, “Travel as a Political Act” urges Americans to go beyond tourist attractions and dig deeper in their travels, to engage with the people we meet and understand what makes us different – and how we are the same.
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Pulitzer winner Nicholas Kristof has hope despite assault on truth

On Monday, the night before one of the most hotly contested midterm elections in recent U.S. history, Nicholas Kristof will be at Gonzaga University in Spokane talking about the state of American journalism in the era of “fake news” and President Donald Trump’s assertion that journalists are enemies of the people