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Wednesday, April 1, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Huckleberries Online

Finding A Way Home

Raevn DeAugustino, after several years living on the street, stands with her cat Leo in the doorway of a modest basement apartment Wednesday, July 12, 2017. She ran away from home and lived on the Spokane streets, in fear for her safety every day. A recent push by the city of Spokane, with help from SNAP, is putting formerly homeless youth, like DeAugustino, into housing. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
Raevn DeAugustino, after several years living on the street, stands with her cat Leo in the doorway of a modest basement apartment Wednesday, July 12, 2017. She ran away from home and lived on the Spokane streets, in fear for her safety every day. A recent push by the city of Spokane, with help from SNAP, is putting formerly homeless youth, like DeAugustino, into housing. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

Raevn DeAugustino’s apartment bears all the hallmarks of a recent move-in.

Her basement studio has a single chair with a stool and a small table. The wood floor is home to several piles of clothes and bedding, which serve as hiding places for her nearly year-old cat, Leo, an orange and white tabby and Maine Coon mix.

DeAugustino’s case manager, Candi Poe, showed up on Wednesday morning with a move-in basket, featuring items such as a shower curtain and soap, that sent the 21-year-old into peals of theatrical glee.

“Oh my gosh, garbage bags!” DeAugustino exclaimed, laughing.

Even unfurnished, the modest apartment is a triumph for the young woman. Before moving in less than two weeks ago, DeAugustino had spent the past three years homeless and living on Spokane’s streets after aging out of the foster care system with no place to go.

Spokane is in the final weeks of a challenge to house 100 homeless young people, ages 12 to 24, in 100 days. King and Pierce counties also are participating, with backing from A Way Home Washington, an advocacy group for homeless youth.

DeAugustino is one of 65 young people who have so far found a permanent place to live during the challenge, thanks in part to a collaboration between social service agencies and the city to make it easier for young people to get evaluated for housing. Full story. Rachel Alexander/SR




Huckleberries Online

D.F. Oliveria started Huckleberries Online on Feb. 16, 2004. Oliveria's Sunday print Huckleberries is a past winner of the national Herb Caen Memorial Column contest.