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Never too late to tell

FILE - In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, American ships burn during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (Associated Press)
FILE - In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, American ships burn during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (Associated Press)

Elizabeth McIntosh finally has her story published. Her reporter’s account of the Pearl Harbor attack was considered too graphic to print decades ago. Yesterday, the Washington Post printed her words.  

The account is graphic – and reminds us of the tragedy, the victims, and the terror that reigns when countries choose war:  

In the morgue, the bodies were laid on slabs in the grotesque positions in which they had died. Fear contorted their faces. Their clothes were blue-black from incendiary bombs. One little girl in a red sweater, barefoot, still clutched a piece of jump-rope in her hand.”

In addition to a journalism career, McIntosh, now 97, worked in the Office of Strategic Services and the Central Intelligence Agency. She retired to Lake Ridge, Virginia.

(S-R photo: In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, American ships burn during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.