An uncertain, and sometimes grim, future awaits Washington’s aging Hispanic farmworkers
Isabel Vega waits for a van to take her and her daughter Irene Vega, to an Orchard north of Wenatchee -- near Chelan, Wash -- to work on Friday, July 15, 2016, in Wenatchee, Wash. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)

An uncertain, and sometimes grim, future awaits Washington’s aging Hispanic farmworkers

UPDATED: TUESDAY, JAN. 17, 2017, 5:02 P.M.

Isabel Vega stands on an aluminum ladder and works with an economy of movement that betrays her 65 years. Each snip with her pruning sheers and every swipe of her hand is exact, a precision forged from decades of repetition. Vega, Hispanic, is part of a population that the U.S. Census Bureau anticipates to more than quadruple by 2050, to 13.8 million from 2.9 million in 2010.





Nation/World

Abraham Lincoln assumed the Presidency and was sworn into office with his hand on this Oxford Bible, in 1861. Writing on these pages is attestation by W.T. Carroll, Clerk of the Supreme Court, that this book was used.

Donald Trump will use two Bibles on Inauguration Day, including one used by Lincoln

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18, 2017, 9:17 A.M.

new When George Washington took the oath of office as the country’s first president in 1789, he placed his hand upon the Bible while speaking those solemn 35 words required by the Constitution, beginning a tradition that has come to define the pomp and circumstance of Inauguration Day. And though the act of swearing upon a Bible held significance at the time, the particular book he chose did not.



Idaho

Ann Burgeson does the responsible thing and shovels the snow away from the fire hydrant acroos the street from her home in Coeur d'Alene on Friday, Jan.13, 2017. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)
Ann Burgeson does the responsible thing and shovels the snow away from the fire hydrant acroos the street from her home in Coeur d'Alene on Friday, Jan.13, 2017. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)

Huckleberries: Kids’ family size grows when the question is ‘cookies?’

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18, 2017

When two neighborhood children showed up at the front door of Casa Oliveria in Coeur d’Alene, they wanted to shovel the driveway for money. Their snow shovels were as big as they were. They didn’t get the shoveling job. But the fresh-baked cookies that they received were worth punching the doorbell. However, they wanted more than one cookie apiece.



Region



Features

Aubrey Shimek Davis, Joe Mazzie and Alyssa Jordan rehearse a scene from “Disgraced,” now playing at Stage Left Theater in Spokane. (Special to The Spokesman-Review / James Snook)
Aubrey Shimek Davis, Joe Mazzie and Alyssa Jordan rehearse a scene from “Disgraced,” now playing at Stage Left Theater in Spokane. (Special to The Spokesman-Review / James Snook)

‘Disgraced’ at Spokane’s Stage Left packs a wollop

TUESDAY, JAN. 17, 2017, 4:11 P.M.

Every religion has its own idiosyncrasies, observes one of the characters in Ayad Akhtar’s “Disgraced,” but it soon becomes clear that there are only certain idiosyncrasies they’re willing to tolerate. The Pulitzer-winning play, which opened at Stage Left this weekend, ...




Outdoors

This Oct. 2010 photo provided by Joe Sebille shows a grizzly bear in Washington state's North Cascades. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says a hiker’s photo confirms a sighting of a grizzly bear in Washington state’s North Cascades for the first time in perhaps half a century. (JOE SEBILLE / Courtesy of Joe Sebille)
This Oct. 2010 photo provided by Joe Sebille shows a grizzly bear in Washington state's North Cascades. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says a hiker’s photo confirms a sighting of a grizzly bear in Washington state’s North Cascades for the first time in perhaps half a century. (JOE SEBILLE / Courtesy of Joe Sebille)

Feds draft plan to restore grizzly bears to North Cascades

MONDAY, JAN. 16, 2017, 6:30 A.M.

Federal officials released a draft plan this week for restoring grizzly bears to the North Cascades. Following two years of public process, the plan presents four options, ranging from taking no action to varying efforts of capturing bears from other ...



Voices

Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett walks off the field after an NFL football divisional football game against the Atlanta Falcons on Saturday, Jan. 14, 2017, in Atlanta. The Falcons won 36-20. (David Goldman / AP)
Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett walks off the field after an NFL football divisional football game against the Atlanta Falcons on Saturday, Jan. 14, 2017, in Atlanta. The Falcons won 36-20. (David Goldman / AP)

Christilaw: Losing hurts, but Bennett a sore loser after Seahawks’ loss

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18, 2017

Losing sucks. There’s no two ways about it. You invest blood, sweat and tears into something and come up short. It hurts. Bad. Losing can cut you to your very soul, and how you handle it reveals a great deal ...



Business

This  Dec. 22, 2016,  photo shows Pepper the robot at Westfield Mall in San Francisco. The SoftBank Robotics humanoid robot can greet shoppers and has the potential to send messages geared to peoples age and gender through facial recognition. (Jeff Chiu / AP)

Robots and artificial intelligence set to upend the art of making a sale

UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18, 2017, 7:08 A.M.

updated Softbank Robotics has a vision of a world in which many retailers incorporate artificial intelligence technology into brick-and-mortar stores, in which it feels normal and reflexive for you to approach a robot with customer service questions. It’s part of a wider push across the retail industry to bring more automation and data science to one of the few parts of the business that largely remains an art: The act of making a sale.



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