EndNotes

Cancer: Cause and Effect

These Munchkin broccoli plants live up to their name with petite, but delicious, heads of broccoli. Special to  (SUSAN MULVIHILL Special to / The Spokesman-Review)
These Munchkin broccoli plants live up to their name with petite, but delicious, heads of broccoli. Special to (SUSAN MULVIHILL Special to / The Spokesman-Review)

As we move through the maze of healthcare – diagnoses and care - the challenges seem to increase, especially as we age.  When I had cancer eight years ago, one woman said to me, “I eat broccoli so I will never get cancer.”  My internal voice wanted to scream out loud, “Really?! Call the CDC to tell them that if we all eat broccoli, we will be cancer-free!”

The good news is that scientists are getting closer to identifying what does lead to cancer and therefore, how we can treat and cure this insidious disease.

In the New York Times, we read about what the scientific community is learning:

Scientists increasingly see cancer as a genetic disease defined not so much by where it starts — colon, liver, brain, breast — but by genetic aberrations that are its Achilles’ heel. And with a detailed understanding of which genetic changes make a cancer grow and thrive, they say they can figure out how best to mount an attack.”

Good news for all…enough to celebrate, with broccoli salad perhaps.

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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