EndNotes

It is a wonderful life

In this undated publicity still photo, James Stewart, as George Bailey, center, is reunited with his wife, played by Donna Reed, left, and children during the last scene of Frank Capra’s 1946 classic, “It’s A Wonderful Life.” NBC will broadcast the film on Dec. 12 and 24 at 8 p.m.Associated Press photos (Associated Press photos)
In this undated publicity still photo, James Stewart, as George Bailey, center, is reunited with his wife, played by Donna Reed, left, and children during the last scene of Frank Capra’s 1946 classic, “It’s A Wonderful Life.” NBC will broadcast the film on Dec. 12 and 24 at 8 p.m.Associated Press photos (Associated Press photos)

December 22: Soon the days will offer daylight noticeably longer. The shadows of 4:30 will disappear and sunshine will linger.

Some believe that depression is greatest this time of year. Take George Bailey who tries to kill himself in “It’s a Wonderful Life”  by jumping off a bridge into the December darkness. Clarence – an angel, of course – saves him. Poor George was motivated to end his life by money – or the missing of it.

The belief of increased suicide attempts at the holidays is actually statistically unsupported. It’s spring that grabs that credit. Perhaps it is the debt to the IRS come April 15 that renders hopelessness or longing for something just beyond one’s reach.

No matter the disappointment at any time of year – it is always best to reach for an angel –a friend, a trusted loved one, a skilled professional - who can bridge a lighted way to hope. After all, it is a wonderful life.

(S-R archive photo: James Stewart, as George Bailey, center, is reunited with his wife, played by Donna Reed, left, and children during the last scene of Frank Capra’s 1946 classic, “It’s A Wonderful Life.”)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.







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