EndNotes

Yes, no, maybe…I really don’t know!

This Oct. 11, 2012 photo provided by the Brigham and Women's Hospital shows a monthly calendar vitamin pack used in a long-term study on multivitamins. America's favorite dietary supplements, multivitamins, modestly lowered the risk of developing cancer in healthy male doctors who took them daily for more than a decade, the first large study to test these pills has found. The study was published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012. (Brigham And Women's Hospital)
This Oct. 11, 2012 photo provided by the Brigham and Women's Hospital shows a monthly calendar vitamin pack used in a long-term study on multivitamins. America's favorite dietary supplements, multivitamins, modestly lowered the risk of developing cancer in healthy male doctors who took them daily for more than a decade, the first large study to test these pills has found. The study was published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012. (Brigham And Women's Hospital)

When it comes to health issues, the media reports contradictory “evidence” almost weekly.  Once again, we hear that what we thought would protect us, may not actually do anything good at all. What is a person to do?

My doctor says, “Be sensible. We may learn later that mega dosing on even something as common as vitamins may lead to trouble.”

Decisions, decisions.

(S-R archives photo)




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.






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