EndNotes

Health report card for seniors

Pam Horn administers the flu vaccine to employee Michael Karolitzky at Philly Flu Shots on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, in Philadelphia. The flu season arrived early in the U.S. this year, but health officials and experts say it's too early to say this will be a bad one. Experts say evidence so far is pointing to a moderate flu season - it just looks worse because last year's season was so mild. Flu usually doesn't blanket the country until late January or February. Now, it's already widespread in more than 40 states. That could change when the next government report comes out Friday. (Matt Rourke / Associated Press)
Pam Horn administers the flu vaccine to employee Michael Karolitzky at Philly Flu Shots on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, in Philadelphia. The flu season arrived early in the U.S. this year, but health officials and experts say it's too early to say this will be a bad one. Experts say evidence so far is pointing to a moderate flu season - it just looks worse because last year's season was so mild. Flu usually doesn't blanket the country until late January or February. Now, it's already widespread in more than 40 states. That could change when the next government report comes out Friday. (Matt Rourke / Associated Press)

The State of Aging and Health in America 2013 just released its annual report today. The collaborative report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services lists a report card in one section that measures how U.S. residents 65 and older are doing.in terms of  "Healthy People 2020" targets.

United States seniors met or exceeded six of the "Healthy People 2020" targets. But fell short on several others, including not getting their flu shots.

U.S. seniors did well on getting more exercise, cutting obesity rates, quitting smoking and taking meds for high blood pressure and for getting mammograms and colorectal screenings.

But they didn't get enough flu protection. The goal of Healthy People 2000 is for 90 percent of folks 65 and older to get flu shots but only 66.9 percent do. Seniors are also short on pneumonia vaccines (68.1 percent of seniors got them, but the goal is 90 percent.)

(Spokesman-Review archives photo)

 




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Spokesman-Review features writer Rebecca Nappi, along with writer Catherine Johnston of Olympia, Wash., discuss here issues facing aging boomers, seniors and those experiencing serious illness, dying, death and other forms of loss.





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