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EndNotes

Wed., Aug. 6, 2014, 11:04 p.m.

Cambodian justice ~ at long last

In this photo released by the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, a hearing is held at a U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The U.N.-backed tribunal on Wednesday began a hearing to prepare for the genocide trial of the two senior surviving leaders of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge, under whose rule an estimated 1.7 million people died in the late 1970s from starvation, exhaustion, disease and execution. (Nhet Heng / Extraordinary Chambers In The Courts Of Cambodia)
In this photo released by the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, a hearing is held at a U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The U.N.-backed tribunal on Wednesday began a hearing to prepare for the genocide trial of the two senior surviving leaders of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge, under whose rule an estimated 1.7 million people died in the late 1970s from starvation, exhaustion, disease and execution. (Nhet Heng / Extraordinary Chambers In The Courts Of Cambodia)

The film “The Killing Fields” tells the story of the Khmer Rouge and the murdering of Cambodian citizens.  More than 1.7 million people died between 1975 and 1979. After decades of delayed justice, a verdict of guilty has been rendered against two of the most senior surviving leaders. The two men were convicted of murder and extermination, among other crimes. They are sentenced to life in prison. Another trial will follow with charges of genocide.

Eight years ago I met a Cambodian woman in a New Orleans hospital where we were receiving cancer treatment.  Her name was Siconda and she spoke very little English. When I asked her husband some questions, he said, “She lived in the trees for two years in Cambodia. She is now very brave against cancer.”  

Today, a slice of justice in Cambodia is offered for Siconda and for all those who suffered at the hands of the madmen.

(S-R photo: The hearing at a U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.) 




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