Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Cloudy 40° Cloudy
Staff > Local news > JoNel Aleccia > Stories
This individual is no longer an employee with The Spokesman-Review

Most Recent Stories

News >  Idaho
March 10, 2006, midnight
Gordon McNeil settled into his favorite chair Thursday morning and prepared to open a vein. Nothing unusual about that.

News >  Idaho
March 8, 2006, midnight
On the advice of police, Coeur d'Alene officials have expanded a city ordinance limiting sales of cold and allergy medications that can be used to make methamphetamine, even as Idaho legislators consider statewide regulations. Liquid, liquid capsule and gel capsule formulations were added to an ordinance approved last fall requiring medications containing pseudoephedrine to be sold only in limited quantities from behind store counters, City Attorney Mike Gridley said.

News >  Idaho
March 3, 2006, midnight
Avid readers in Coeur d'Alene will soon find it easier to get their fix of fiction – or any other genre – thanks to a new partnership between the city library and those in the rest of the region. By summer, more than 50,000 North Idaho library patrons are expected to share a single kind of library card and access to some 2.5 million library records, once the Coeur d'Alene Public Library joins a regional consortium.

News >  Idaho
March 2, 2006, midnight
With as many as 60 babies a year born to addicted mothers in Kootenai County, officials here are conflicted over an Idaho bill that proposes to jail pregnant women who use methamphetamine and other drugs. Debate about the bill that narrowly passed the Idaho Senate swirled Wednesday in local hospitals, treatment centers and agencies that care for vulnerable children.

News >  Idaho
March 1, 2006, midnight
Nearly a year after critics complained Kootenai Medical Center mothballed vital medical equipment used to examine sexual assault victims, hospital officials said they'll seek a new tool. KMC officials said Tuesday they plan to spend as much as $13,000 on a culposcope, a state-of-the-art magnifying device that can be used to prove sexual abuse in court.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 26, 2006, midnight
Linette Freeman knows what people think. She can see it in the eyes that don't meet hers. She can hear it in the comments that follow her into restaurant booths.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 25, 2006, midnight
Coeur d'Alene's sleek new public library – the first the city's ever built – exists only in an architect's vision. But the 38,000-square-foot building moved closer to reality this week after the Seattle foundation operated by billionaire Paul Allen approved a $100,000 matching grant to pay for it.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 22, 2006, midnight
No question: Idaho's substance abuse system needs an overhaul. That much was clear from a scathing state audit released in December, a Sandpoint lawmaker said this week. But Republican Sen. Shawn Keough said state officials shouldn't move too quickly to create a special commission to tackle the problem. More time and more information are needed, she said, to understand the implications of the 117-page report that detailed failings of a system aimed at helping people addicted to drugs and alcohol.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 20, 2006, midnight
Backers of a proposed Boys & Girls Club program in Post Falls are finalizing plans to lease property from the school district to build a 20,000-square-foot youth center. Details were expected to be ironed out Friday and sent to the Post Falls School Board for consideration at a March meeting, said Boys & Girls Club President Cort Wilcox and schools Superintendent Jerry Keane.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 18, 2006, midnight
It took a record $365 million Powerball lottery jackpot to lure Paul Prows over the Idaho border Friday morning. Anything less would be pocket change, to hear the Spokane construction worker tell it.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 15, 2006, midnight
Dan Adamson understands that voters might not take seriously a candidate for governor who gives away T-shirts and iPods, wants to export state inmates overseas and hopes to lure Hispanic supporters with free tacos. The Chubbuck businessman, who owns a chain of nursing homes, acknowledged Tuesday that there's a chance his deliberately outrageous views may be marginalized as he challenges Republican U.S. Rep. C.L. "Butch" Otter to be the state's next governor.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 15, 2006, midnight
About 350 low-income children in Eastern Washington and North Idaho may have to find new ways to spend summer days after funding for a national sports camp with a 17-year history in Pullman was cut from the federal budget. Organizers at Washington State University are scrambling to repair cuts to the local branch of the National Youth Sports Program, which last summer provided five weeks of child care, sports camps and meals to poor local families, including about 50 children from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 14, 2006, midnight
The most striking thing about the satellite pharmacy on the second floor of Kootenai Medical Center is the complete absence of drugs. No bottles of pills, no vials of liquid, not a single intravenous drip bag waiting for use.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 12, 2006, midnight
Aundi Star is the first to admit she was a landlord's nightmare. Bad credit, three kids and a habit of skipping out when the rent was due dogged the 35-year-old North Idaho woman.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 10, 2006, midnight
Fingers crossed, Coeur d'Alene community leaders are counting on public willingness to build and sustain a proposed $65 million Salvation Army Kroc Center project near the heart of the city. Attaining some $5 million in local donations could be the nudge Coeur d'Alene needs to outbid up to seven other sites in the West for what organizers say is a badly needed recreation and social service resource. So far, backers have raised $1.4 million. City and agency officials met in Coeur d'Alene this week to discuss design plans for the proposed 104,000-square-foot center.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 8, 2006, midnight
A Coeur d'Alene lawmaker again is introducing legislation requiring strict new standards for Idaho child care providers, saying clearer language and bipartisan support could lead to wider debate – and approval. "If we can get it out to the floor, I know it has a chance," said Rep. George Sayler, R-Coeur d'Alene, whose bill died last year in a House Health and Welfare Committee on a 6-6 vote.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 7, 2006, midnight
At first, Judy Reid didn't know what was wrong. The North Idaho woman couldn't understand why her son and his wife were always out of money, why the house was always a wreck, why their three children were always sick – or scared.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 4, 2006, midnight
Beneath dentist Ken Bevan's drill, 7-year-old Paige Neal was a trouper. Faced with three fillings and two extractions in an hour Friday morning, the student from Atlas Elementary School in Coeur d'Alene tried to be brave.

News >  Idaho
Feb. 2, 2006, midnight
If organizers have their way, a large segment of the audience for this week's production of "The Vagina Monologues" in Coeur d'Alene will never have heard of the show. It won't be because those audience members don't understand the issues addressed by the award-winning performance. Sexual abuse, rape and domestic violence are often topics too familiar to the target audience for this year's benefit show: single, working mothers.

News >  Spokane
Feb. 1, 2006, midnight
The names of Washington state residents who test positive for the virus that causes AIDS will be kept on file soon under a change health officials say is necessary to retain up to $5 million in federal funds for treatment. The move dismantles a 1999 system that used codes instead of names to keep track of some 4,000 people who have been diagnosed with HIV but show no symptoms, said John Peppert, manager of HIV prevention services with the Washington Department of Health.

News >  Idaho
Jan. 30, 2006, midnight
Nearly two years ago, it looked like a North Idaho agency aimed at helping vulnerable children in court might not survive a crisis of its own. In mid-2004, organizers of the local Court Appointed Special Advocates program faced news cameras and pointed questions about the sudden resignation of the agency's executive director, Rhonda Naylor, amid allegations of financial mismanagement and embezzlement.

News >  Idaho
Jan. 28, 2006, midnight
The governor's race has come to North Idaho with two of the three candidates visiting Coeur d'Alene this week to remind voters they won't forget one of the fastest-growing areas in the state. Candidates for the open seat in the 1st U.S. Congressional District also have been making frequent trips to the Panhandle lately, solidifying that campaign season has arrived.

News >  Idaho
Jan. 27, 2006, midnight
Amid the aromas of hot chili and fresh-baked cornbread, Asa Sizemore stepped into the basement of the outreach center at Coeur d'Alene's St. Thomas Catholic Church. Already, at least two dozen people were waiting in line, eager for a free meal and a place away from the freezing fog earlier this week. Within half an hour, more than 50 – middle-aged men, young women, a couple of children – had gathered for dinner and dessert.

News >  Idaho
Jan. 22, 2006, midnight
SANDPOINT – Passionate Lake Pend Oreille anglers and worried state Fish and Game Department officials clashed more than a few times Saturday during a packed-house public meeting to consider the best way to restore legendary fisheries on the 90,000-acre lake. More than 80 members of the fishing community gathered for four hours in the Sandpoint Community Center, where they criticized perceived problems that ranged from skewed data collection to a gill-netting sampling plan opponents fretted would simply snag the best fish from the lake.

News >  Idaho
Jan. 22, 2006, midnight
Even gray winter skies can't dim the light streaming through the atrium of the former Coeur d'Alene amusement arcade. The Rev. Tim Remington stands alone in the room's bright center, right where the Adventures in Fun carousel once revolved. Soon, the man known as "Pastor Tim" plans to transform the 20,000-square-foot landmark from an abandoned hulk to a center for spiritual renewal – a process he hopes is mirrored in the lives of the people he serves.