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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Kevin Keating

This individual is no longer an employee with The Spokesman-Review.

Most Recent Stories

News >  Idaho

Suit Says Schools For Troubled Teens Set Stage For Abuse State Report Says Allegations By Former Students Are Valid

The parent company for three pricey schools for troubled teens near Bonners Ferry is being sued by two former students for fraud, racketeering and battery. The suit was filed in District Court on Tuesday. It alleges that Rocky Mountain Academy, Northwest Academy, Ascent and their California-based parent company, CEDU Educational Services Inc., grossly overcharge parents, and have ill-trained staff who verbally and physically abuse students.
News >  Idaho

Coldwater Comes Out Against Mine Company Says Lake ‘Too Precious A Resource To Be Put At Risk’

Coldwater Creek, one of North Idaho's largest employers, is lending its economic muscle to oppose plans for the Rock Creek mine in Montana. The Sandpoint based mail-order catalog company has purposely stayed out of local political battles until now. But company president Dennis Pence said the Asarco Inc. mine and its potential to pollute Lake Pend Oreille was too important an issue to remain silent.

News >  Idaho

Idahoans Get Rare Chance To Select Justice Retirement Of Byron Johnson Creates Contested Election For Seat On The Idaho Supreme Court

For the first time in 30 years Idaho residents - not a panel of judges and lawyers - will decide who sits on the Supreme Court. The May primary election marks the first time in decades there will be a contested election for an open seat on the Idaho Supreme Court. Justice Byron Johnson is retiring when his six-year term expires in January. Justices often have left office or retired in the middle of their term. That allowed a judicial council to screen applicants and select candidates to present to the governor. The governor would then appoint the new justice, by-passing a popular vote.

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