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Teen details allegations of abuse in singer’s trial


Michael Jackson enters the courtroom Thursday after arriving late at Santa Barbara County Superior Court. 
 (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
Michael Jackson enters the courtroom Thursday after arriving late at Santa Barbara County Superior Court. (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
Martin Kasindorf USA Today

SANTA MARIA, Calif. – The 15-year-old boy at the center of the Michael Jackson criminal case testified in detail Thursday about twice being groped by the entertainer, who showed up late to court wearing pajama bottoms and slippers.

Jackson’s attorney peppered the boy with questions and accused him of making up the allegations.

The day’s drama began when Superior Court Judge Rodney Melville issued an arrest warrant for Jackson when he wasn’t at the courthouse on time. He also threatened to revoke Jackson’s $3 million bail but gave the singer an hour to appear. Jackson arrived about five minutes past the deadline. The judge did not impose any sanctions.

Jackson, 46, had gone to the hospital early Thursday for a severe back problem, said his attorney, Tom Mesereau. He arrived at the courthouse wearing blue pajama pants, slippers, a white T-shirt and a blue blazer and was walking slowly.

The boy told the jury about long visits to Jackson’s Neverland Valley Ranch in 2003. He said they often drank alcohol – wine, vodka and whiskey – in Jackson’s bedroom. He said Jackson referred to wine as “Jesus juice” and said it would help relax the boy, a cancer survivor.

He said they looked at sex magazines, and he described two instances in Jackson’s bed when the entertainer allegedly groped the boy, who was then 13.

The boy will take the stand again Monday. The court is handling pending motions today.

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