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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Levi Hutton expands acreage for Hutton Settlement Children’s Home

Levi Hutton purchased 38 additional acres in the Pasadena Park area of the Spokane Valley, as part of his plan to build an orphan’s home that would become the Hutton Settlement Children’s Home. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Levi Hutton purchased 38 additional acres in the Pasadena Park area of the Spokane Valley, as part of his plan to build an orphan’s home that would become the Hutton Settlement Children’s Home. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Levi Hutton purchased 38 additional acres in the Pasadena Park area of the Spokane Valley, as part of his plan to build an orphan’s home at the cost of “several hundred thousand dollars.”

Hutton had previously purchased 112 acres for the home. This tract was adjacent to it.

Plans for the institution were being drawn up by architects and would include central buildings and outlying cottages, all made of brick. It would house 100 children.

The institution would open in 1919 and is today known as the Hutton Settlement Children’s Home. It has served thousands of children since then.

From the police beat: Traveling salesman E.C. Wigley vigorously denied that he was actually Professor Wise, a clairvoyant who had fleeced several Coeur d’Alene women years earlier.

One of his victims spotted Wigley in Yakima and had him arrested. She said she was “absolutely positive” that he was Professor Wise. Two other women victims were brought from Coeur d’Alene to the courtroom in Yakima and they, too, were prepared to testify to his identity.

However, Wigley said he had never set foot in Coeur d’Alene. He said he could prove he was in Minnesota at the time of the crimes. He lived in Minnesota until several months ago when he moved to Yakima and “has many friends.” He said it was all a case of mistaken identity. He was released on bail pending a hearing.

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