Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 42° Partly Cloudy
News >  Spokane

Spokane will prioritize ‘efficient and effective’ snow response despite budget woes. Here’s how

UPDATED: Fri., Nov. 13, 2020

Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward, with Clint Harris, Spokane street department director, left, and Scott Simmons, Spokane public works division director, provide the media with an overview of the CityÕs Snow Response Plan, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020 at the cityÕs maintenance yard in east Spokane.  (Colin Mulvany/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW)
Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward, with Clint Harris, Spokane street department director, left, and Scott Simmons, Spokane public works division director, provide the media with an overview of the CityÕs Snow Response Plan, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020 at the cityÕs maintenance yard in east Spokane. (Colin Mulvany/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW)

With more people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, Spokane city officials are reminding residents to make way for snow plows this winter.

The city is once again imploring residents to park on the odd side of the street during winter and immediately move recreational vehicles and boats off the street and into winter storage.

“We really need help from the community,” Mayor Nadine Woodward said.

Despite the limitations the pandemic has placed on the city budget, Woodward said at a press conference on Friday that the city will continue to prioritize its response to snowy weather.

City residents have made it clear they “want more plowing, in more areas, and sooner,” Woodward said.

“An efficient and effective snow response is vital to the safety of our pedestrians, to our commuters, and despite the strain on our annual budget right now – especially because of COVID – we have prioritized spending on snow efforts,” Woodward said.

This year, the city has added to its fleet an additional snow gate, a tool popular with property owners that prevents plows from creating snow berms in front of driveways. The city now has 17 snow gates.

The Streets Department is also adding a “wing blade” to its repertoire, allowing crews to maneuver into and plow tighter spaces in older neighborhoods with narrow streets. If it works well, the city will consider purchasing additional wing blades.

The city will add a new station to measure street temperatures at higher elevations, allowing it to more adeptly respond to storms like Friday’s, when the South Hill saw inches of snow and downtown received nothing but rain.

The city also will also establish two new stockpiles of deicer and sand, allowing road crews simpler and more efficient access to the materials while responding to a storm.

Following a snow storm, cars must be parked on the odd side of the street in residential areas. Downtown, cars must be moved off the street between 12 a.m. and 6 a.m.

Scott Simmons, the city’s director of Public Works, urged businesses and residents to clear the sidewalks and ramps in front of their properties to make way for pedestrians after a snowfall.

During and after a snow storm, residents can track the progress of city plows on the city’s website.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.



Annual health and dental insurance enrollment period open now

 (Courtesy Washington Healthplanfinder)
Sponsored

2020 has been a stressful year for myriad reasons.